Van Den Heede says his mast crack only widens on port tack.

In his weekly Satellite phone call with Golden Globe Race Chairman Don McIntyre on December 17, 2018 UTC, the first-place sailor Jean-Luc Van Den Heede gave an important insight into his worsening mast problems. Van Den Heede said the mast crack affecting the shrouds only worsens upwind on a port tack. Van Den Heede has about a 800 nm over Dutch skipper Mark Slats. Will Van Den Heede’s mast fail him in the upwind work to France over 4,000 nm away? We will see.

MastCrack

Five boats are still racing. Two are in the south Atlantic and three are in the Pacific  Ocean. Van Den Heede says he plans to be in the Northern Hemisphere by Christmas.

Below is the GGR’s latest press release:

Day 169 –  Mark Slats gains another 154 miles on Jean-Luc Van Den Heede

  • Igor Zaretskiy heads back to Moscow for medical checkup
  • Istvan Kopar escapes one storm only to risk running into another
  • Susie Goodall statement
  • Uku Randmaa’s ETA at Horn – Wednesday 19th Dec

Dateline 13:00 UTC  17.12. 2018 – Les Sables d’Olonne, France

Dutchman Mark Slats has taken a further 154 miles out French Race leader Jean-Luc Van Den Heede over the past 7 days, reducing the gap to 794 miles with 4,300 miles still to run before the winner returns to Les Sables d’Olonne at the end of January.

Both have had their share of problems during the past week. Slats, who was suffering severe stomach problems until tracking the source to rotten milk, was forced to lie hove-st for the first time during this race after running into heavy head winds

On Saturday he texted:  BAD WEATHER GUSTING 40 KT AND 5M SEAS ON THE NOSE. NO FUN!

followed 5 hours later with: HOVE TO NOW. FIRST TIME I STOP SAILING BECAUSE BAD WEATHER

Since then, business has returned to normal but Slats has to endure another 500 miles of northerly winds before beginning to experience the Easterly air flow now benefiting Van Den Heede 13 degrees to the north.

These head winds gave Van Den Heede equal concern at the end of last week when the pounding even in moderate conditions, extended the crack in Matmut’s already damaged mast. The 73-year old Frenchman was forced to climb the mast a sixth time to reinforce the temporary binding that is all that holds the lower shroud attachment points to the spreader above.  Now that he is back to reaching across the winds, all seems OK for the moment, but he knows that to finish, he must sail very conservatively.

Today, Estonian Uku Randmaa is within 230 miles of Cape Horn, and looking forward to rounding some time on Wednesday. He is experiencing boisterous 40 knot following winds at present, but the forecast suggests that this could die to almost nothing within the next 48 hours.

Fourth placed American/Hungarian Istvan Kopar has  repaired  the failing bearings within the steering pedestal aboard his Tradewind 35 Puffin, and having successfully dodged the storm that threatened to overtake him last week by heading south into the NO-GO Zone, now faces the prospect of running the gauntlet before another low pressure system in 3 days time. This one threatens  to be the biggest storm to-date with 60-70 knot winds and 12-15 metre seas. Race HQ has advised Kopar to thread his way south of the first small storm but not drop below 53S latitude before December 20,

Picture shows Istvan Kopar’s current position but the weather forecast  for 19th DEC overlaid showing a  big storm scheduled to move across fast from the west.

Finland’s Tapio Lentinen whose Gaia 36 Asteria remains covered in barnacles and trails in 5th place among the Glolden Globe racers some 6,300 miles behind the race leader,  has a solid breeze in typical southern Ocean weather for now and will have been  buoyed by the fact that he has taken 102 miles out of Jean-Luc’s lead over the past week.

Igor flying home for a medical

Igor Zaretskiy, who dropped down to the Chichester Class after stopping in Albany Western Australia last week to rid his hull of barnacles and make repairs, announced today that he will return to Moscow for a health check before continuing in the race. In 2010, the Russian sailor suffered a heart attack after winning the Jester Challenge solo transatlantic race, and after undergoing a further health check in Australia last week, has been advised to return to Russia and see if further surgery in necessary.

There is no time timit for Igor to restart in the Chichester Class – Francis Chichester stopped for 48 days in Sydney during his one-stop circumnavigation in 1966/7 – but there are practical limitations. After the end of March, the onset of winter storms in the Southern Ocean makes it unadvisable to attempt a Cape Horn. rounding until the following Spring.

Susie Goodall statement

After arriving in Punta Arenas on Friday, Susie Goodall thanked all those involved in her rescue and suggested that she can’t wait to get back to sea. In a statement she says;

“If you asked me if I would do this again, now knowing what it’s really like, I would say yes in a heartbeat! But as I said to the Chilean Navy captain who brought me ashore from MV Tian Fu, ‘I created so much work for everyone involved in the rescue,’ to which he responded ‘Of course you must do it again!’

You may ask why?! Some people just live for adventure – it’s human nature. And for me, the sea is where my adventure lies. Having grown up admiring Tracy Edwards and Ellen MacArthur, I just knew that one day I needed to try to do this too. Every seafarer understands the risks involved but that’s what makes us stronger and able to overcome other challenges in life.

I can’t tell you what is next beyond spending time with family and friends over Christmas and enjoying a glass of grog, but that fire in my belly is far from out, so watch this space…!”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.