Ep. 48: Gone with the Wynns’ Jason and Nikki Trade Their RV for a Sailboat Interviewed by Linus Wilson

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-b22hr-924a0d

Jason and Nikki Wynn of the Gone with The Wynns YouTube Channel and Blog speak to Linus Wilson about their transition from travel by RV to sailing catamaran. They talk about outfitting their 10-year old boat, sailing offshore, and exploring the Bahamas, Panama, and Ecuador in a sailboat. They discuss the life of successful digital nomads, and (spoiler) it does not involve four-hour workweeks.

https://www.gonewiththewynns.com/

https://www.youtube.com/user/gonewiththewynns

 

Host Linus Wilson is podcasting from the Slow Boat in Bora Bora, French Polynesia. He discusses the new sailing movie Adrift based on the true story by Tami Oldham Ashcraft originally in the book Red Sky in Mourning and the AMC series of the Terror based on a novel by Dan Simmons about the lost sailing ships and men from the Franklin Northwest Passage expedition and its lost ships the Terror and Erebus.

You can get this audiobook and three others at

http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

 

The eBook of AROUND THE WORLD SINGLE-HANDED: The Cruise of the Islander by Harry Pidgeon is at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07C3THFZV

 

 

AMERICAN PRACTICAL NAVIGATOR: Volume 1, 2017 Edition by Nathaniel Bowditch

 

 

We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at

http://www.mantusanchors.com/?affiliates=15

Mantus Anchors is a title sponsor of this video.

Support the videos at

http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

 

On the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast Linus Wilson has interviewed the crew of Sailing SV Delos, WhiteSpotPirates (Untie the Lines), Chase the Story Sailing, Gone with the Wynns, MJ Sailing, Sailing Doodles, SV Prism, Sailing Miss Lone Star, and many others.

Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:

 

Slow Boat to the Bahamas

 

Slow Boat to Cuba

https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook

 

and

How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing

 

You can watch the Slow Boat’s round the world adventure and other videos about the most interesting cruising sailors in the world at

www.youtube.com/slowboatsailing

 

have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.

Associate Producers, Anders Colbenson, Kevin Yeager, Larry Wilson, and Nelson Pidgeon

Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at

www.slowboatsailing.com

 

Copyright Linus Wilson, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

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Ep. 48: Gone with the Wynns’ Jason and Nikki Trade Their RV for a Sailboat Interviewed by Linus Wilson on the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast

catsJason and Nikki Wynn of the Gone with The Wynns YouTube Channel and Blog speak to Linus Wilson about their transition from travel by RV to sailing catamaran. They talk about outfitting their 10-year old boat, sailing offshore, and exploring the Bahamas, Panama, and Ecuador in a sailboat. They discuss the life of successful digital nomads, and (spoiler) it does not involve four-hour workweeks.

https://www.gonewiththewynns.com/

https://www.youtube.com/user/gonewiththewynns

 

Host Linus Wilson is podcasting from the Slow Boat in Bora Bora, French Polynesia. He discusses the new sailing movie Adrift based on the true story by Tami Oldham Ashcraft originally in the book Red Sky in Mourning and the AMC series of the Terror based on a novel by Dan Simmons about the lost sailing ships and men from the Franklin Northwest Passage expedition and its lost ships the Terror and Erebus.

Get the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast on Stitcher and iTunes!

You can get this audiobook and three others at

http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

 

The eBook of AROUND THE WORLD SINGLE-HANDED: The Cruise of the Islander by Harry Pidgeon is at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07C3THFZV

 

 

AMERICAN PRACTICAL NAVIGATOR: Volume 1, 2017 Edition by Nathaniel Bowditch

 

 

We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at

http://www.mantusanchors.com/?affiliates=15

Mantus Anchors is a title sponsor of this video.

Support the videos at

http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

 

On the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast Linus Wilson has interviewed the crew of Sailing SV Delos, WhiteSpotPirates (Untie the Lines), Chase the Story Sailing, Gone with the Wynns, MJ Sailing, Sailing Doodles, SV Prism, Sailing Miss Lone Star, and many others.

Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:

 

Slow Boat to the Bahamas

 

Slow Boat to Cuba

https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook

 

and

How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing

 

You can watch the Slow Boat’s round the world adventure and other videos about the most interesting cruising sailors in the world at

www.youtube.com/slowboatsailing

 

have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.

Associate Producers, Anders Colbenson, Kevin Yeager, Larry Wilson, and Nelson Pidgeon

Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at

www.slowboatsailing.com

 

Copyright Linus Wilson, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

Anchoring Tips in the Bay of Virgins, Fatu Hiva | Sailing Upwind from Tahuata | S2E10

Linus gives you the inside scoop on the tricky but most beatiful anchorage in the South Pacific, the Bay of Virgins in Fatu Hiva. Linus and Daly sail upwind to the remote Fatu Hiva from Vaitahu, Tahuata in the Marquesas. Fading light forces them to motor in before sunset giving stunning views of the rock formations in this remote anchorage.

Linus buys some pamplemous (sweet green grapefruit) and a tiki before climbing to the cell phone tower hill. That was a hike that he saw the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast episode 29 guests from Chase the Story do when they visited Fatu Hiva.

Hanave, the village next to the Bay of Virgins, has little in the way of provisioning, there is no fuel, there is no way to change money, it is not a port of entry, and the anchorage is small. For those reasons, Linus recommends not making it your first stop after a Pacific Crossing. It is easy enough to double back to it in mild conditions after checking in, resting, and refueling in Hiva Oa.

Subscribe to get season 2 in the crossing the Pacific and sail the Marquesas to Tahiti.

Ep. 47: Harry Pidgeon, Around the World-Single Handed the Cruise of the Islander Ch. 1-3 Read by Linus Wilson on the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast

Get the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast on Stitcher and iTunes!

Harry Pidgeon was the first man to sail around the world in a small yacht via the Panama Canal. He did this historic trip in his 34-foot sailing yawl the ISLANDER between 1921-1924. You will hear the first three chapters of the audiobook, including how he built his boat on the beach for $1,000.

02-drawings

You can read the full eBook for Kindle of Harry Pidgeon’s Around the World Single-Handed; the Cruise of the ISLANDER on Amazon. 

 USA – $.99 4/24/18-4/26/18 & $8.99 – 4/27/18 onward

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07C3THFZV

Above is the USA link. Below are other country eBook links.

 Canada

https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B07C3THFZV

UK

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07C3THFZV

Australia

https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B07C3THFZV

France

https://www.amazon.fr/dp/B07C3THFZV

You can hear the rest of the audiobook of Harry Pidgeon’s Around the World Single-Handed; the Cruise of the ISLANDER by pledging as little as $5 on 

www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

Harry Pidgeon was the first man to sail around the world via the Panama Canal in a small sailboat or yacht. Unlike Joshua Slocum he pioneered the most popular round the world sailing circumnavigation route which passes through the Panama Canal and under the Cape of Good Hope and Cape Agulhas.

GET AROUND THE WORLD SINGLE-HANDED by Harry Pidgeon in eBook at
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07C3THFZV

Joshua Slocum was lost at sea before the Panama Canal was built and had to sail through the Straits of Magellan in Patagonia. Harry Pidgeon was a farmer from Iowa who built a wooden, engine-less boat on the beach in Los Angeles, California. It was a 34-foot gaff-rigged yawl called, the ISLANDER. Harry Pidgeon was the first man to sail around the world twice in a yacht, and the second to sail around the world alone in a small sailboat. He sailed to Hawaii, the Marquesas, Tahiti, Fiji, Samoa, the New Hebrides, New Guinea, the Torres Straight, Australia, Kupang, Indonesia, Christmas Island, Cocos-Keeling, Durbin, Cape Town, South Africa, St. Helena, Ascension Island, Trinidad, and many other ports on his 1921-1924 circumnavigation. He was awarded the Blue Water Medal for his amazing solo-circumnavigation. Harry survived boarding by cannibals, a collision with an oil tanker, and shipwreck in Africa. He was one to hold fast regardless of the hardship with good cheer. Pidgeon’s voyage puts him on par with sailing firsts like that of Sir Robin Knox Johnston who was the first man to sail around the world alone (non-stop) in the 1968 Golden Globe race.

You can get this audiobook and three others at
http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

The eBook of AROUND THE WORLD SINGLE-HANDED: The Cruise of the Islander is at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07C3THFZV

 

AMERICAN PRACTICAL NAVIGATOR: Volume 1, 2017 Edition by Nathaniel Bowditch

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07CJTYTVP

We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at
http://www.mantusanchors.com/?affiliates=15
Mantus Anchors is a title sponsor of this video.
Support the videos at
http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

On the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast Linus Wilson has interviewed the crew of Sailing SV Delos, WhiteSpotPirates (Untie the Lines), Chase the Story Sailing, Gone with the Wynns, MJ Sailing, Sailing Doodles, SV Prism, Sailing Miss Lone Star, and many others.
Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:

Slow Boat to the Bahamas
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B018OUI1Q2/

Slow Boat to Cuba

https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook

and
How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing

have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producer, Anders Colbenson
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
music by http://www.BenSound.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

Pidgeon v. SLOCUM: Who was the 1st around the world via the Panama Canal in a sailboat?

Harry Pidgeon was the first man to sail around the world via the Panama Canal in a small sailboat or yacht. Unlike Joshua Slocum he pioneered the most popular round the world sailing circumnavigation route which passes through the Panama Canal and under the Cape of Good Hope and Cape Agulhas.

Joshua Slocum was lost at sea before the Panama Canal was built and had to sail through the Straits of Magellan in Patagonia. Harry Pidgeon was a farmer from Iowa who built a wooden, engine-less boat on the beach in Los Angeles, California. It was a 34-foot gaff-rigged yawl called, the ISLANDER. Harry Pidgeon was the first man to sail around the world twice in a yacht, and the second to sail around the world alone in a small sailboat.

GET AROUND THE WORLD SINGLE-HANDED by Harry Pidgeon in eBook at

He sailed to Hawaii, the Marquesas, Tahiti, Fiji, Samoa, the New Hebrides, New Guinea, the Torres Straight, Australia, Kupang, Indonesia, Christmas Island, Cocos-Keeling, Durbin, Cape Town, South Africa, St. Helena, Ascension Island, Trinidad, and many other ports on his 1921-1924 circumnavigation. He was awarded the Blue Water Medal for his amazing solo-circumnavigation. Harry survived boarding by cannibals, a collision with an oil tanker, and shipwreck in Africa. He was one to hold fast regardless of the hardship with good cheer. Pidgeon’s voyage puts him on par with sailing firsts like that of Sir Robin Knox Johnston who was the first man to sail around the world alone (non-stop) in the 1968 Golden Globe race.

You can get this audiobook and three others at
http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

The eBook of AROUND THE WORLD SINGLE-HANDED: The Cruise of the Islander is at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07C3THFZV

We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at
http://www.mantusanchors.com/?affiliates=15
Mantus Anchors is a title sponsor of this video.
Support the videos at
http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

On the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast Linus Wilson has interviewed the crew of Sailing SV Delos, WhiteSpotPirates (Untie the Lines), Chase the Story Sailing, Gone with the Wynns, MJ Sailing, Sailing Doodles, SV Prism, Sailing Miss Lone Star, and many others.
Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:

Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook

and
How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing

have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producer, Anders Colbenson
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
music by http://www.BenSound.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

 

SAILORS BEWARE: Google is lying to you about the “cost of cruising”

For the same reason that you should not get your news from your Facebook feed, you should not trust the estimates from cost of cruising blogs when you Google it. Computers like to give you what you want, and everybody wants to hear that following your salty dreams does not involve the dreaded maxim, B.O.A.T., Break Out Another Thousand.

IMG_0866

I used to think most sailing bloggers were low-balling their cost of cruising estimates to get more views. After the Facebook scandals, fighting in the trenches of the YouTube video algorithm, and blogging more myself, I know the truth. Google is a liar! (Darn lies and algorithms!) Namely, the Google search algorithm gives you an unrepresentative sample of the cost of cruising blogs.

Consider the following thought experiment. A faithful sailing blogger tallies her sailboat expenses every month during the EXPENSIVE refit and EXPENSIVE initial provisioning. In the first month of sailing to the tropics, the gear is new and the boat is packed with food. The frugal cruisers don’t eat out or visit any marinas and steer clear from the yacht club bar. They only spend $99, while posting idilyc anchorage and snorkeling photos. Everybody reads and shares and that blog climbs the search rankings. Meanwhile she keeps on blogging her expenses as they buy more groceries, haul out the boat, visit marinas, and stuff breaks, but few people read those more depressing blogs about getting parts in distant ports for way too much money. The dedicated and honest sailing blogger writes 36 monthly cost of cruising blogs before breaking the pen and swallowing the anchor, but most people read only the one that had the lowest monthly estimate, because that is the only one that comes up on the first page of Google search.

I am going to break down my cruising expenses for 2009 before I bought my first BOAT.

$0

Google algorithm please send this blog to everyone!

You can get the complete estimates of our Bahamas trip in my book. Warning there are lost of B.O.A.T.s in SLOW BOAT TO THE BAHAMAS.

Sean Hannity failed to disclose his conflict to his viewers. Send a complaint to the FCC. He broke the law.

Re: Sean Hannity’s violations of Payola and Sponsorship Indentification – SPONSID

Dear Sir or Madam:

I believe Sean Hannity violated Section 317 of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47 U.S.C. § 317. That law requires broadcasters to disclose to their listeners or viewers if matter has been aired in exchange for money, services or other valuable consideration. The law says that an announcement must be aired when the subject matter is broadcast. The supporting rule is 47 C.F.R. § 73.1212.

After the raid of New York attorney Michael Cohen on April 9, 2018, by the U.S. Attorneys and the FBI in Southern District of New York, Mr. Sean Hannity of Fox News condemned the raid of Michael Cohen without disclosing that he was one of three clients of Mr. Cohen. Mr. Hannity only disclosed that he was a client after a judge ordered his name be spoken in public court.

Fox News, Sean Hannity, and Mr. Hannity’s TV and radio programs should be investigated for fines, civil, and criminal sanctions regarding this matter.

Sincerely,

 

[Your Name]

Send your letter to

Federal Communications Commission

Enforcement Bureau

Investigations & Hearings Division

445 12th Street, SW

Washington, DC 20554

Building a 34-foot Sailing Yawl on the Beach in Los Angeles by Harry Pidgeon

The Islander was my first attempt at building a sailboat, but I don’t suppose there ever was an amateur built craft that so nearly fulfilled the dream of her owner, or that a landman ever came so near to weaving a magic carpet of the sea.

As a youth I was not favorably situated for taking up a seafaring career, but I had many qualifications for the job. My love of the sea did not come from early association, for I was born on a farm in Iowa and did not see salt water until I went to California, when I was eighteen years of age. So far as I know, none of my ancestors ever followed the sea….

This is an excerpt from chapter 1 of Around the World Single-Handed: The Cruise of the Islander by Harry Pidgeon. The first eBook edition launches on Amazon on April 23, 2018. You can download this and two other sailing audiobooks for as little as $5 here.

http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

onbeach.jpg…When I quit the little flatboat at Port Eads, I had resolved to see more distant lands in a vessel of my own. From that time, I began to take an interest in sailing craft and to contemplate voyages.

But it takes more than wishes to acquire a suitable craft and go on long voyages, so eventually I returned to California and became a photographer among the great trees of the Sierras. After a few years of this work, pleasant through it was, I longed for new scenes.

About this time, I came across the plan of a boat that seemed to be very seaworthy and, in addition, was not too large for one man to handle. Moreover, the construction of it did not seem too difficult for my limited knowledge of shipbuilding. Business with lumberman and tourists in the big woods, and the proceeds from the sale of a small farm, put me in the possession of the necessary funds, so I decided to build my long-dreamed-of ship and go on a voyage to the isles of the sea. From the mountains I went down to the shore of Los Angeles Harbor, located on a vacant lot and began actual work of construction. The plan from which I was to model my ship was one that had been drawn for Captain Thomas Fleming Day, who had wide experience in sailing small boats, and it was Captain Day’s idea of what a small seagoing craft should be. It was a V-bottom or Sea Bird boat, a type developed by Captain Day and yacht designers on the staff of Rudder Magazine. The reason for using the V-bottom type was that it is easier for the amateur builder to lay down and construct. Three safe and handy cruising boats were brought out and the plans published in the Rudder. They were Sea Bird, Naiad, and Seagoer. The Islander was built after the lines of Seagoer and the general construction plan is the same, but I used ideas from each of these boats and added some ideas of my own as suggested by the material at hand and my limited resources. All the information I had when building the Islander is contained in a booklet published by the Rudder Publishing Company of New York (How to Build A Cruising Yawl), containing instructions for building Sea Bird, Naiad, and Seagoer.

With the coming in of the year 1917, the actual work of construction was commenced with the laying down of the keel. The timbers for the keel were eight by twelve inches of thickness and the largest piece twenty-eight feet long. When I hear any one talking about my frail craft, I always think of those keel timbers. They were cut to shape with saw and adz, and a piece of iron weighing twelve hundred and fifty pounds was cast in a near-by foundry for the bottom piece of the keel, and to act as ballast. When the timbers and iron ballast piece were bolted together with large iron bolts, they formed an exceedingly strong backbone for the frame of the vessel.

Except for the stem and a few pieces about the cabin, which were of oak, the wood used in the construction was of Douglas fir or Oregon pine. The timbers for the frame were all very heavy and re-enforced at the bilge with steel plates that I cut from tank plate. After the frame was bolted together as strongly as possible, the planks were put on. The bilge strake and all above were full length in one piece. Working alone as I did, the planking was a long, hard job, and the thick, heavy boards were bent into place without the aid of a steam box. The bilge strakes were two and a half inches thick and seven and a half inches wide amidships, tapering to six inches at the ends. These pieces were bent over twenty inches edgewise as well as being brought round the curve of the sides.

After they were in place, a carpenter from a boat works looked at them and said, “I know how we would put those planks on at the shop, where we have a steam box and plenty of help, but how you got them on I can’t see.” It was the most difficult piece of work about the construction, but when it comes to blocking up and driving wedges they could not have beaten me in the boat shop. Those planks had to come to place or break. That they would break was what I feared, but they did not break. Gradually something like a boat began to appear, and spectators began to arrive, ask questions and give advice.

There was a beachcomber living in a shack nearby, who used to come and tell me that the keel of my boat was cut away too much forward. “She won’t come up into the wind. She’ll fall away to loo’ard.” He informed me he was going to build a boat fifty-feet long and ten-feet beam, in which he was going to Africa to hunt lions. He had invented a reefing gear with which he could reef sails without leaving the wheel. Was going to have an electric motor for an auxiliary and generate electricity with a windmill on deck. Nor was I the only builder on the shore. In sight of my works but across the channel on the Terminal side, a colored Moses was erecting an ark with which to transport a colony of his followers to Liberia. As he was laying down the keel, a question in regard to the size of his projected ship brought the answer that all depended on the donations he got. The donations seemed to keep coming in, for as my boat took shape, his grew into a structure two stories high, with windows alow and aloft, and a stove pipe appeared through a broken pane.

No doubt as my boat was rising from the heap of timbers on the sand it was often taken for another one of those freaks, but a yacht builder, who became interested in what I was doing, told a friend of mine that he could not do the work better himself.

When the planking was on, the deck was laid and covered with canvas, and, then, the house was added. The sides of the house were one solid piece each and carried aft to form the cockpit coamings. The cabin was twelve feet long, arranged with a berth on either side and spaces for drawers and a wood-burning stove. Under the deck between the house and the cockpit was a good space where supplies for a long voyage could be stored. The cockpit was built water-tight, and self-bailing through lead scuppers carried straight down through the hull.

When it came to the caulking, I was advised to get a professional to do it. However, remembering the success I had had in making small boats water-tight, I approached this job with more confidence than almost any other about my new vessel, and few boats are so dry as mine.

The masts were made and fitted, and the name “Islander,” which I had given the new ship, I painted on the stern board. I dug the ground away underneath and laid down ways on which the vessel might slide into the water. Some friends, who were intending to be at the launching, thought they would have time to see a ship launched from a near-by yard and then see the Islander go in, but my boat went in first. From the laying down of the keel to the launching, the Islander came near to being entirely the work of my own hands.

The Islander was rigged as a yawl and was thirty-four-feet long over all, ten feet nine inches beam, and drew five feet of water with no load in her. She carried about six hundred and thirty square feet of sail in her three sails. She was adapted to the use of auxiliary power, but for many reasons, mostly financial, I did not install a motor. However, the real sport is to make the elements take one where he wants to go; and then a motor never functions properly when left alone with me. For a tender I built a little skiff nine-feet long, and when at sea this was hauled on board, turned over against the house, and lashed fast. In this position it was carried wherever I sailed.

The Islander cost me about one thousand dollars for material and a year and a half of hard work.

When the sails were bent, yachting friends, who knew more about the rules of the road than I did, joined me and we tried the new ship out on a cruise to Catalina Island. She proved to sail well, and all remarked on the ease with which she handled. Many pleasant days were spent sailing about the near-by islands, sometimes with friends but more often alone, and in one of the many sunny coves in the lee of Catalina Island my little ship might be found at all seasons. In the meantime, I procured books and instruments, and amid pleasant surroundings, I began to learn something of navigation.

 

Kris Larsen completes his circumnavigation in an engine-less, junk-rigged sailboat.

There were no headlines, but reclusive Australian sailor Kris Larsen completed his circumnavigation in his engine-less, electronics-free, junk-rigged sailboat the Kehar on March 21, 2018, according to his wife’s Facebook page. You can see our video of his 104-day leg from Panama to Maui, Hawaii.

Mr. Larsen and his wife Nat Quintos Uhing calls Darwin, Australia home. He left Darwin in 2014 on his latest voyage that took him west about the world via the Cape of Good Hope and the Panama Canal.

Kris Larsen on boat with crew Snapped by Raymond Bideaux

Photo by Raymond Bideaux of Chris Larsen and his wife Nat Uhing on the SV Kehar just outside Haiti.

Sailing Totem completes their circumnavigation in Mexico ten years after leaving Seattle.

Most west-coast based boats first cross their outbound track on a circumnavigation in Mexico. The Seattle based SV Totem and the Gifford family are no different. They announced they had crossed their outbound track near Zihuatenejo, Mexico. Behan Giffords long-running blog caught the imagination of many a sailor. Good for them!

My book studied successful west-coast circumnavigators, and it found most complete a round the world sailing trip in 5.5 years. The SV Totem crew are on slow end of the distribution with 10 years and counting to return to their home port.

Here is a profile done by the Business Insider of SV Totem:

No word if the Seattle based boat SV Delos, Slow Boat Sailing Podcast episode 10 and 33 guests, will be following in their wake next season. Delos, which is in the eastern Caribbean, has been trailing and bumping into SV Totem for a while and has interviewed their crew.

They departed Panama in late March after transiting the canal. Their quick progress to Mexico indicates they may be trying to reach the USA before the start of hurricane season on June 1. Mexico is one of the most active regions for hurricanes in the eastern Pacific. SV Totem saw the devastating category 5 hurricanes Irma and Maria pass just north of them when they were cruising the eastern Caribbean in fall 2017. They sustained no damage, and eventually spent much of the remainder of hurricane season which goes from June to November in Grenada. Grenada is considered outside the “box” of hurricane risk for the Caribbean.