Kiribati Tourism Confirms the Sea Nymph Hailed Christmas Island

Slow Boat Sailing has been able to confirm with Kiribati officials that the Sea Nymph did hail the Christmas Island Marine Guard in the third week of May 2017. Based on position reports that Ms. Appel supplied to the U.S. Coast Guard her boat traveled about 4 knots (nautical miles per hour) in the two weeks it took to reach Christmas Island, Kiribati. In position reports that cannot be verified, by Slow Boat Sailing, Ms. Appel said her boat traveled at about 2 knots for the rest of the month of May until June 26, 2017. From June 26 to October 1, 2017, the Sea Nymph averaged less than 1 knot, according to Ms. Appel. That latter period, averaging one knot, was one where her boat was moving downwind in the northeast trades to Wake Island. Her boat has a hull speed of 7.5 knots.

 

Photos: Christmas Island, Kiribati, Marine Guard logs of the VHF calls to the SV Sea Nymph, from May 18-19, 2017, which were obtained by Slow Boat Sailing.

Jennifer Appel says she spoke to the “calling station” on May 17, 2017. The Christmas Island Marine Guard said they spoke on May 18, 2017, and continued to hail the Sea Nymph with no response on May 19, 2017, because she gave them incomplete information on the May 18, 2017 conversation. The officials in Kiribati told Slow Boat Sailing that they even had records of the Sea Nymph’s call sign.

Ms. Appel’s said on the bonus episode to episode 42:

“We were at Christmas Island on the 16th, and we circled it on the 17th. That was when we were told that we were too, our draft was too deep to enter the lagoon. There was no protected anchorage available for rigging repairs. We cruised out of there on the morning of the 18th.”

“Who did you hail then?” I asked in that interview.

“Channel 16. They call it the ‘calling station.'” Ms. Appel said.

Later in the interview Ms. Appel said, “When the ‘calling station’ on channel one six says you may not enter.”

“‘You may not enter.’ So, you thought it was someone official telling you that you couldn’t enter?” I said.

“Yeah, he laughed at me when I told him that I needed 10 feet in order to safely navigate. He started laughing and said ‘We don’t have that. We don’t have that,'” she said.

“See I don’t see that on the charts though I see that if you drew 15-feet you could anchor there,” I said.

Ms. Appel has said her Morgan 45 designed Starratt and Jenks sailboat had a 8.5-foot draft when http://www.sailboatdata.com says that boat should have a 6.5-foot draft. Ms. Appel said she lacked an “island” chart for Christmas Island. See the video below:

Kiribati records counter Ms. Appel’s assertion of a chilly reception by a dismissive official on the VHF. Instead, Kiribati Marine Guard callers repeatedly tried to get more information about the vessel sailing near their safe harbor.

This is the third, and final, VHF conversation on her trip that Ms. Appel has said she made that Slow Boat Sailing has confirmed with third parties. On May 5, she spoke to a USCG plane after a Mayday call near the Hawaiian islands. She told the plane that she was OK. That call was confirmed in the October 27, 2017, survivor debrief that Slow Boat Sailing obtained with a Freedom of information act request. On October 1, 2017, (Honolulu time) or October 2, 2017, local Wake Island time, the US Air Force confirmed to Slow Boat Sailing that the Sea Nymph by VHF requested a tow at Wake Island (point 19), but the Sea Nymph could not be located. It is not clear why the Sea Nymph deviated from its course 750 miles south of Honolulu for Wake Island over 2,000 nautical miles to the west northwest.

20Map

Figure: (c) Linus Wilson, 2017, Slow Boat Sailing, reported positions by Ms. Appel to the US Coast Guard obtained through a FOIA request.

Ms. Appel has made several statements that have proved untrue. Ms. Appel has said in the past that she faced a force 11 storm leaving Honolulu, but weather data found no such winds or storm activity in that area. She said that she saw sharks bigger than were ever recorded in an area she called the “Devils Triangle”, which is a geographic region that does not exist. She claimed her boat was 50-feet long to journalists, but has since conceded on the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast episode 42 that it was a 45-foot long boat.  Some parts of the journey are in dispute. The USCG told the Associated Press that it hailed the Sea Nymph on June 15, 2017, which responded that it would be arriving in Tahiti the next day. In contrast, Ms. Appel told the USCG that point 14 on the figure (6S and 157W) was the closest her boat got to its planned destination of Tahiti. The USCG Honolulu has told Slow Boat Sailing that it has no plans to investigate the circumstances of the SV Sea Nymph rescue.

Do not copy or reproduce the figure without obtaining the express, written consent of Linus Wilson. To contact the author send an e-mail to linuswilson [at] yahoo <dot> com . Dr. Linus Wilson holds a six-pack captain’s license. He has sailed 10,000 nautical miles in his Island Packet 31 sailboat. In it he has visited the Bahamas and Cuba, transited the Panama Canal and crossed the Pacific to Tahiti. He has written three books including How to Sail Around the World Part-Time.

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Crowhurst Movie Secrets Revealed

Two movies about the doomed sailor Donald Crowhurst are coming out in early 2018. Colin Firth and Rachel Weisz star in The Mercy debuting in February 2018 and directed by James Marsh. Another film distributed by Studio Canal UK is Crowhurst. We talk to the director Simon Crumley of the psycho-horror, drama Crowhurst movie starring Justin Salinger. We unlock the secrets of this tragedy at sea from the 1968 Sunday Times Golden Globe Race. The 50th anniversary solo-nonstop Golden Globe race is scheduled for 2018 to leave from Les Sables-d’Olonne, France, the same town which is the start and finish of the solo, nonstop, unassisted sailing race the Vendee Globe. Linus Wilson host of the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast talks to Simon Rumley about the reasons Donald Crowhurst cheated in the race and descended into madness. They talk about Sir Robin Knox Johnston, Bernard Moitessier, Nigel Tetly, and other participants in the Golden Globe Race. Crowhurst circled the south Atlantic waiting for the other participants to round the Cape of Good Hope and Cape Horn after sailing the stormy southern Ocean. Crowhurst made a disqualifying stop in Argentina’s Rio Salado. His deception was only discovered when his boat was found adrift. Slow Boat Sailing Podcast 40 and 42 guest Jennifer Appel loves the story of this race as recounted in the Voyage for Madmen by Peter Nichols. She was rescued thousands of miles off course under mysterious circumstances after she said she spent over 5 months at sea after a three-week trip from Hawaii to Tahiti went awry. The Crowhurst story still captures the imagination after many portrayals such as in the documentary Deep Water.

See

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/crowhurst-review-1042551

On May 23, 2017, Jennifer Appel and Natasha Fuiva and the dogs Valentine and Zues departed Oahu, Hawaii in the sailing vessel Sea Nymph bound for Tahiti. On October 25, 2017, they were rescued by the US Navy and Marines of the USS Ashland 900 miles from Japan. Listen to their harrowing story of survival at Sea. Captain Linus Wilson, OUPV-Inland the creator of the Slow Boat Sailing brings up unanswered questions in this deep dive into the disaster with extensive interviews with the survivors.

 

An edited version of:

AT SEA

10.27.2017

Courtesy Audio

This is a media availability on a telephone conference line moderated by public affairs officer Lt. Adam Cole. Interviewees include rescued mariners Jennifer Appel and Tasha Fuiava, and personnel of the USS Ashland.

 

Date Taken:       10.27.2017

Date Posted:      10.27.2017 13:24

Category:           Newscasts

Audio ID:            49889

Filename:           1710/DOD_105018743.mp3

Length: 00:35:14

Year      2017

Genre   Blues

Location:            AT SEA

PUBLIC DOMAIN   public_domain_logo.png

This work, Interview with rescued mariners and Navy personnel, must comply with the restrictions shown on https://www.dvidshub.net/about/copyright.

 

Appears in this episode.

 

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Exclusive: The Last Voyage of the SV Sea Nymph as Reported to the USCG

by Linus Wilson

20Map

Position reports tell the story that the doomed SV Sea Nymph made good less than one nautical mile per hour for a period of 97 days downwind between June 26, 2017, and October 1, 2017. This contradicts the assertion by Jennifer Appel to reporters that her boat could sail four-to-five miles per hour. Ms. Appel submitted these position reports to the US Coast Guard (USCG) on October 27, 2017, in a satellite phone call obtained by Slow Boat Sailing through a Freedom of Information Act Request (FOIA). There are approximately 2,200 nautical miles between position 18 and 19 on the figure above. According to Ms. Appel, it took her 45-foot sailboat with an upright mast and working rudder 97 days to go that distance. The 31-foot Slow Boat for example covered 3,500 nautical miles in just 27 days. You can see that trip here.

Slow Boat Sailing has exclusively obtained the strange track of the SV Sea Nymph before its crew of two women and two dogs were rescued 900 miles southeast of Japan by the US Navy on October 25, 2017. These are positions which were reported to the US Coast Guard by the owner of the SV Sea Nymph, a 45-foot Starrett and Jenks sailboat. The audio of the survivor debrief of Jennifer Appel with the US Coast Guard was obtained by the author through a Freedom of Information Act Request (FOIA). Ms. Appel spoke to interviewers from the USCG’s 14th district in Honolulu on board the USS Ashland, a US Navy ship on October 27, 2017.

Ms. Appel said that she hoped to have a 3-week passage to Tahiti from her home port of Honolulu, with her crew member Tasha Fuiava, who had never sailed before. Then, she said that SV Sea Nymph moved generally due south between 155 and 157 west longitude from May 5, 2017 to May 26, 2017. The only major deviation from this course as reported by Ms. Appel was the circling of Christmas Island, Kiribati. Ms. Appel told Slow Boat Sailing that she lacked charts for Christmas Island, Kiribati, the Northern Cooks, and Wake Island that would have let her see the depths in those anchorages. Thus, her only source of harbor information was unreliable VHF calls. Christmas Island and Penrhyn (in the northern Cooks) both had sufficient channel and anchorage depths for the SV Sea Nymph, according to charts, which were examined by Slow Boat Sailing.

On May 26, 2017, Ms. Appel decided it would be too hard to enter any of the atolls in the northern Cook Islands. She said that she lacked charts for those islands, and, by that time, the boat’s motor would no longer start. The Sea Nymph turned around a little over 100 miles north of the port of entry Penrhyn atoll in the Cook Islands. She said after that the sailboat was then bound for Honolulu. Until June 26, 2017, her boat headed due north between 156 and 159 west longitude until they were withing 750 miles south of Honolulu, Hawaii.  For reasons that are not clear, Ms. Appel steered the boat west until it passed by Wake Island on October 2, 2017, local time. Ms. Appel has said little about their path over those 97 days. During that period, she told USCG officers that she set off flares and made VHF distress calls, but did not activate her EPIRB.

The accuracy of this map depends on the veracity of Ms. Appel’s position reports to the USCG. Slow Boat Sailing has only been able to verify points 2, 14, 19, and 20 with independent sources besides Ms. Appel. At point 2, the USCG said it responded to her Mayday call with an aircraft, but it left the scene when she said her vessel was OK.

There is a one-day discrepancy between when the Marine Guard station on Christmas Island, Kiribati, position 14, said they spoke to the Sea Nymph and when Jennifer Appel says they spoke. Jennifer Appel says she spoke to the “calling station” on May 17, 2017. The Christmas Island Marine Guard said they spoke on May 18, 2017, and continued to hail the Sea Nymph with no response on May 19, 2017, because she gave them incomplete information on the May 18, 2017 conversation. The officials in Kiribati told Slow Boat Sailing that they even had records of the Sea Nymph’s call sign.

On October 1, 2017, (Honolulu time) or October 2, 2017, local Wake Island time, the US Air Force confirmed to Slow Boat Sailing that the Sea Nymph by VHF requested a tow at Wake Island (point 19), but could not be located. At point 20, which is approximate, the USS Ashland rescued the Sea Nymph crew 900 miles southeast of Japan.

Ms. Appel has made several statements that have proved untrue. Ms. Appel has said in the past that she faced a force 11 storm leaving Honolulu, but weather data found no such winds or storm activity in that area. She said that she saw sharks bigger than were ever recorded in an area she called the “Devils Triangle”, which is a geographic region that does not exist. She claimed her boat was 50-feet long to journalists, but has since conceded on the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast episode 42 that it was a 45-foot long boat.  Some parts of the journey are in dispute. The USCG told the Associated Press that it hailed the Sea Nymph on June 15, 2017, which responded that it would be arriving in Tahiti the next day. In contrast, Ms. Appel told the USCG that point 14 on the figure (6S and 157W) was the closest her boat got to its planned destination of Tahiti. The USCG Honolulu has told Slow Boat Sailing that it has no plans to investigate the circumstances of the SV Sea Nymph rescue.

The closest path between the 20 numbered points in the figure is about 6,000 nautical miles. The speed of the the Sea Nymph on the first two days was over 5 nautical miles per hour, and the trip to Christmas Island, Kiribati averaged just over 4 nautical miles per hour. From May 17, 2017, to June 10, 2017, the boat’s reported speed fell to about 2 nautical miles per hour. Between June 10, 2017, and the VHF radio contact with Wake Island on October 1, 2017, (Honolulu time), points 17, 18, and 19, the Sea Nymph averaged less than one nautical mile per hour as reported by Ms. Appel to the USCG. Since the longest leg of this trip, 2200 nautical miles, from points 18 to 19 was downwind, the author finds that boat speed very slow and only consistent with a craft completely adrift. Nevertheless, Ms. Appel disputed that her boat was not adrift in her GoFundMe appeal from November 25, 2017, “We were not ‘adrift’. ‘Adrift’ denotes that we had no ability to steer, which fails to account for our ability to circle Christmas Island, leave the Dragon’s Triangle, almost return to Hawaii or navigate over 2000 miles from our failed attempt to return to Hawaii to reach 7.4km Wake Island.”

To the author, these slow reported speeds of less than one knot raise the possibility that the Sea Nymph stopped somewhere between May 5, 2017, and October 1, 2017, (Honolulu time). Those were two points that Slow Boat Sailing has confirmed where the Sea Nymph hailed the USCG and USAF respectively. The maximum hull speed of the Sea Nymph based on the 32.5-foot waterline length reported in sailboatdata.com for the Starrett and Jenks 45 is 7.6 knots. That indicates that the Sea Nymph could reach Wake Island from Tahiti, about 2,400 nautical miles, in less than two weeks. Thus, if the reports of the USCG hailing the Sea Nymph near Tahiti on June 15, 2017, are true, then the crew would have had plenty of time to anchor and go ashore several different ports prior to reaching Wake Island on October 2, 2017, local time.

The Sea Nymph‘s reported speed picked up to 1.7 knots between the confirmed locations of Wake Island and the crew’s eventual rescue 900 mile southeast of Japan.

In the survivor debrief, the USCG expressed surprise and dismay that Ms. Appel did not pull her EPIRB when she started setting off flares and hailing passing ships for a tow, beginning on June 26, 2017. Ms. Appel told the USCG that she was not truly in danger until after they obtained the tow from the Taiwanese fishing vessel on October 24, 2017. On that date, Ms. Appel swam out to the fishing vessel and called for a rescue by way of the fishing vessel’s satellite phone.  The Taiwanese government has disputed Ms. Appel’s allegations that the fishing vessel posed a danger to the women.

Do not copy or reproduce the figure without obtaining the express, written consent of Linus Wilson. To contact the author send an e-mail to linuswilson [at] yahoo <dot> com . Dr. Linus Wilson holds a six-pack captain’s license. He has sailed 10,000 nautical miles in his Island Packet 31 sailboat. In it he has visited the Bahamas and Cuba, transited the Panama Canal and crossed the Pacific to Tahiti. He has written three books including How to Sail Around the World Part-Time.

Check out our videos about this strange voyage below:

 

LAND HO! After 27 Days at SEA, Exploring Hiva Oa, Marquesas, S2E5

After 27 days at crossing 3,500 nautical miles of the South Pacific Ben, Sahia, and Linus sight land of Hiva Oa in the Marquesas. The propeller shaft falls off as they enter port. Something was lost in the translation with the boat yard and the boat is anchored in a questionable location in Tahuaka Bay until the next year. Ben and Sahia say goodbye… at least for a few days. The crew tours Atuona. Linus tries to solve the mystery of the missing fresh water. Ben and Linus get lost attempting to climb Mont Temetiu on Hiva Oa. They turn around on the ridge 800 meters up on the path to Hanemenu Bay. Linus leaves the boat at Marquesas Maintenance Services and gets a ride to the airport for his flight to Tahiti.

The Slow Boat has just over a month to sail the 3,500 nautical miles to Hiva Oa from La Libertad, Ecuador. There would be no time for the extra 700 nm to Tahiti or a month’s quarantine.

Sahia, Ben, and Linus depart the yacht club and sail west overnight. The crew gets seasick and headwinds make them turn north of the rhumb line or the great circle route to the Marquesas.
Subscribe to get season 2 in the crossing the Pacific and sail the Marquesas.
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Get $5 off your wind speed indicator at

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The SailTimer Wind Instrument™ is a wireless, solar-powered masthead anemometer. There are no wires to install down the mast. It is the first anemometer designed for sailboats, with wind cup blades that maintain equal accuracy when sailing along heeled over. It is submersible, so even works great on sailing dinghies, since it does not require a 12-volt battery. But on boats large and small, it works with a range of apps, and continues to gain new features as more apps support it and add new functions. This means that it is not a one-time purchase; you can wake up tomorrow, and it can do things that it did not do today. There is also an accessory that can receive the wireless transmissions and wire in to your NMEA network, for displaying the wind speed and direction on wired marine electronics. This also happens to be the only masthead anemometer that you can raise even if your boat is already in the water, without needing to lower or climb the mast. It is also the first masthead anemometer that has a digital compass built right in to the wind directoin arrow. No calibration required; it knows which way it is pointing. This is also a connected device, allowing you to share wind conditions and location online. That is a handy safety feature like a float plan, but can also let you be at home and check live wind conditions on your boat.

SailTimer Wind Instrument™ is a corporate sponsor of Slow Boat Sailing.

We will be running contest where our most loyal Patreon supporters can become part of our crew literally as we explore the paradise islands of the South Pacific.
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Our one Star or Executive Producer patron can join the crew without winning the drawing.

Patrons of the round the world vlog and podcast get bonus podcast episodes and free audiobooks of How to Sail Around the World Part-Time and Slow Boat to Cuba. They get never before released audiobook chapters of Slow Boat to the Bahamas. You can also get access to many podcasts and videos early as a patron.
Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

and
How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producer, Anders Colbenson
Support the Slow Boat Sailing vlog and podcast at
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On the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast Linus Wilson has interviewed the crew of Sailing SV Delos, WhiteSpotPirates (Untie the Lines), Chase the Story Sailing, Sailing Doodles, SV Prism, Sailing Miss Lone Star, and many others.
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
music by http://www.BenSound.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, 2017

No charts, dinghy, & autopilot before sailing offshore? SV Sea Nymph & Jennifer Appel

The Hawaii sailors say they had trouble making port because they lacked large-scale charts. The skipper, Jennifer Appel, failed to buy them before she left Honolulu on May 3. Without “island” or large-scale charts, of the Christmas Island, Kiribati, the northern Cooks, or Wake Island, Appel said she had to make VHF calls to see if the anchorages were safe. A responsible skipper would have bought charts (paper or electronic) for the islands on the way.

Nothing about the mysterious case of the SV Sea Nymph is clear cut, because the skipper Jennifer Appel has been caught in so many lies about sharks sizes, a force 11 storm , and even the size of her boat (50-feet versus 45-feet long)!

The dinghy pictured in thumbnail a 2017 picture by Michael Krijnen was no where to be found when Jennifer Appel and Tasha Fuiava were rescued by a Taiwanese fishing vessel and the US Navy’ ship the USS Ashland LSD48.

Mariners Rescued by USS Ashland (LSD 48)
AT SEA
10.27.2017
Navy Media Content Services
Public Domain

Interviews with mariners Jennifer Appel and Tasha Fuiava, and Cmdr. Steve Wasson, USS Ashland commanding officer.

USS Ashland Rescue
WHITE BEACH, OKINAWA, JAPAN
10.30.2017
Video by Lance Cpl. Jonathan Pearson
American Forces Network Okinawa
Public Domain

 

Ms. Appel told Sailing Anarchy that she had to hand steer and lost sleep because rookie sailor Tasha never got the hang of steering weeks into the voyage. There is little evidence that the boat had an autopilot or windvane. Very few sailboats leave for a three-week offshore passage for Tahiti without a self-steering device.

The SV Sea Nymph owned by Jennifer Appel had underwent a major refit before leaving Honolulu. Did the rigging problems occur on the voyage, in Honolulu, or were their rigging problems at all?

All this adds up to a skipper who had not prepared her boat for a major offshore passage. Appel says they were at sea for over 5-months before being rescued by the US Navy on October 25, 2017, over a thousand miles off course. Appel and Fuiava said they departed Honolulu bound for Tahiti.

Interviews with rescued mariners aboard USS Ashland
By Navy Media Content Services, 10/27/17, Public Domain
Interviews with mariners Jennifer Appel and Tasha Fuiava, and Cmdr. Steve Wasson, USS Ashland commanding officer.

Pictures from Michael Krijnen of Jennifer Appel on a motor scooter and in a dinghy are used with his permission.
We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at
http://www.mantusanchors.com/?affiliates=15
Mantus Anchors is a corporate sponsor of this episode.
Get $5 off your wind speed indicator at

http://www.SailTimerWind.com/SlowBoatSailing

The SailTimer Wind Instrument™ is a wireless, solar-powered masthead anemometer. There are no wires to install down the mast. It is the first anemometer designed for sailboats, with wind cup blades that maintain equal accuracy when sailing along heeled over. It is submersible, so even works great on sailing dinghies, since it does not require a 12-volt battery. But on boats large and small, it works with a range of apps, and continues to gain new features as more apps support it and add new functions. This means that it is not a one-time purchase; you can wake up tomorrow, and it can do things that it did not do today. There is also an accessory that can receive the wireless transmissions and wire in to your NMEA network, for displaying the wind speed and direction on wired marine electronics. This also happens to be the only masthead anemometer that you can raise even if your boat is already in the water, without needing to lower or climb the mast. It is also the first masthead anemometer that has a digital compass built right in to the wind directoin arrow. No calibration required; it knows which way it is pointing. This is also a connected device, allowing you to share wind conditions and location online. That is a handy safety feature like a float plan, but can also let you be at home and check live wind conditions on your boat.

SailTimer Wind Instrument™ is a corporate sponsor of Slow Boat Sailing.

Support this channel for great rewards:
http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing
Patrons of the round the world vlog and podcast get bonus podcast episodes and free audiobooks of How to Sail Around the World Part-Time and Slow Boat to Cuba. They get never before released audiobook chapters of Slow Boat to the Bahamas. You can also get access to many podcasts and videos early as a patron.
Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

and
How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producer, Anders Colbenson
Support the Slow Boat Sailing vlog and podcast at
https://www.patreon.com/slowboatsailing

(c) Linus Wilson, 2017
Vermilion Advisory Service, LLC

SV Sea Nymph had no autopilot and a crew member who could not steer.

Jennifer Appel, told readers on a deleted Sailing Anarchy forum that her boat that was rescued by the U.S. Navy lacked an autopilot:

“I have been on boats with autopilots and in my experience a boat needs 2.  One to work while the pin is being fixed on the other one. . The autopilots i have experience with quit at the most ridiculous times. . As such,  i had people teach me to sail without the autopilot.  I knew it would be tough. I would have bought at least one if i hadnt spent so much on rigging. . Yes,  i expected tasha to pick it up on The fly the same way i did. . It is exhausting but we weren’t racing…  Just cruising.  The most expensive way to travel 3rd class,” Ms. Appel wrote.

In the Sailing Anarchy podcast episode 27, she told Alan Block the host that Tasha Fuiava struggled at hand steering for most of the voyage.  Thus, poor sailing skills may explain the “10-knot current” experienced in the Northern Cooks as detailed in our video below:

The Sailing Anarchy writer and podcaster Alan Block, who goes by “Mr. Clean” on the site, confirmed on that forum that the poster alias was Jennifer Appel.

 

Zeus and Valentine, Hawaii Sailors’ dogs, are back in the USA by Linus Wilson

The most popular members of the Sea Nymph crew, the dogs Zeus and Valentine, are back in the USA after their long boat ride and Navy rescue. Jennifer Appel, the owner of the abandoned SV Sea Nymph told Slow Boat Sailing on the bonus episode to Episode 42 of the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast that they were staying in Long Island, New York. The crew of Zues, Valentine, Ms. Appel and Tasha Fuiva were rescued by the US Navy’s USS Ashland approximately 900 miles from Japan. The two women and two dogs were dropped off in Okinawa, Japan on October 30. The women appeared on the Today Show in New York City on November 8, and the dogs have been in the USA ever since.

Mariners with Dogs on Ashland

Public Domain US Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan R. Clay: Tasha Fuiava, right, and Jennifer Appel, both from Honolulu, with their dogs Valentine, left, and Zeus, answer questions during a media call next to USS Ashland (LSD 48) Commanding Officer Cmdr. Steven Wasson in the captain’s cabin.

“They are with us.” said Ms. Appel. Ms. Appel spoke to Slow Boat Sailing on October 25, 2017, on Skype from Long Island, New York. “I stayed with them in quarantine in Japan,” she continued.

“We cannot get back into Hawaii until they have gone through two rounds of rabies shots and their titers,” said Appel. She continued, “We did not leave them. If you leave, you abandon a dog there [Japan], they euthanize it.”

The dog’s cannot return to Hawaii until at least 60 days from landing in Japan. Nevertheless, depending on when the rabies shots were began, and whether their 5 months at sea is classified as a “short” or “long” trip the necessary waiting period shots and tests could take four to six months according to a FAQ from the Maui humane society.

Ms. Appel had nothing good to say on the podcast about New York except, “It’s New York.” I guess she won’t be buying one of the heart symbol t-shirts while she is waiting to return to Oahu, Hawaii.

Ep. 42: Rescued Hawaii Sailor Jennifer Appel Talks About Cruising in Her Two Doomed Boats with Linus Wilson on the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast

Jennifer Appel talks about her ten years of sailing prior to her rescue by the USS Ashland on October 25, 2017, about 900 miles from Japan. She confirms that her boat was a Charlie Morgan designed Starratt and Jenks 45 sailboat despite her assertions to the media it was 50 feet long. She talks about the wreck of her Coranado 34 sailboat in 2012 and the hull modifications that she made to the SV Sea Nymph which she abandoned on October 25, 2017. This skype interview was conducted while Appel and Tasha Fuiava were in Long Island, New York just after Thanksgiving 2017.USS Ashland arrives in Okinawa with Mariners

Public domain photo by Petty Officer, 3rd Class, Jonathan R. Clay, US Navy. Jennifer Appel on the USS Ashland in Japan.

Subscribe to the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast on Stitcher and iTunes!

In the patron-only bonus interview Ms. Appel tells Slow Boat Sailing that her boat lacked charts which would allow her to see the depths in the anchorages in Christmas Island, Kiribati, the northern Cook Islands, and Wake Islands. She has said they passed close to all three places after their spreader was damaged without stopping.

See

https://www.patreon.com/posts/ep-42-patron-of-15571072

https://slowboatsailing.wordpress.com/2017/11/28/rescued-hawaii-sailor-left-for-tahiti-without-charts-for-islands-on-the-way/

We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at
http://www.mantusanchors.com/?affiliates=15

Mantus Anchors is a corporate sponsor of this episode.

Get $5 off your wind speed indicator at

http://www.SailTimerWind.com/SlowBoatSailing

The SailTimer Wind Instrument™ is a wireless, solar-powered masthead anemometer.  There are no wires to install down the mast.  It is the first anemometer designed for sailboats, with wind cup blades that maintain equal accuracy when sailing along heeled over.  It is submersible, so even works great on sailing dinghies, since it does not require a 12-volt battery.  But on boats large and small, it works with a range of apps, and continues to gain new features as more apps support it and add new functions.  This means that it is not a one-time purchase;  you can wake up tomorrow, and it can do things that it did not do today.  There is also an accessory that can receive the wireless transmissions and wire in to your NMEA network, for displaying the wind speed and direction on wired marine electronics.  This also happens to be the only masthead anemometer that you can raise even if your boat is already in the water, without needing to lower or climb the mast.  It is also the first masthead anemometer that has a digital compass built right in to the wind directoin arrow. No calibration required;  it knows which way it is pointing.  This is also a connected device, allowing you to share wind conditions and location online.  That is a handy safety feature like a float plan, but can also let you be at home and check live wind conditions on your boat.

SailTimer Wind Instrument™ is a corporate sponsor of Slow Boat Sailing.

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Associate Producer, Anders Colbenson
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Check out our latest video about “How to make a sailing video that does not stink!!!”

In that video you’ll get the first glimpse of our new male, toy poodle, puppy Avery (apricot). We also feature our recently passed male, toy poodle Daly (black) who in his 11 years sailed 6,500 nm, sailed to the Bahamas, Cuba, Panama, Ecuador, and in French Polynesia. He transited the Panama Canal and crossed the equator in our 31-foot sailboat. Daly will star in many yet to be released episodes of season 2 of Slow Boat Sailing in French Polynesia. We visited places like Hiva Oa, Fatu Hiva, Moorea, and Tahiti together in season 2. He will be missed.

(c) Linus Wilson, 2017
Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC

Rescued Hawaii Sailor Left for Tahiti without Charts for Islands on the Way by Linus Wilson

Jennifer Appel told Slow Boat Sailing that she lacked large-scale island or harbor charts on board the SV Sea Nymph, which would have allowed her to see the depths in the anchorages they passed up. In our patron-only bonus episode to the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast episode 42, Jennifer Appel tells how she hated electronic charts and lacked electronic charts for the South Pacific.

In an e-mail exchange the author asked Ms. Appel, “Did you have paper charts for Christmas Island, Kiribati and the Northern Cooks? Did you have a paper chart for Wake Island?” All those were islands that Ms. Appel has said the SV Sea Nymph passed by on their 5 month journey ending in a US Navy rescue. Ms. Appel replied, “I had overall charts for those locations but none that were island specific.”

USS Ashland arrives in Okinawa with Mariners
Photo credit: Public domain US Navy photo by by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan R Clay. Jennifer Appel with her dog on the USS Ashland in Okinawa, Japan.

“What I have learned about GPS’s is that sometimes they do not match exactly what the paper chart says. You can have things in the Garmin that are five miles away from where they actually are in reality. So my experience has been to always use paper charts as the law, and use the GPS as a secondary backup,” Ms. Appel said.

Slow Boat Sailing asked, “So the Garmin chart plotter with the screen did it have charts loaded on it or no?”

“Yeah,” replied Ms. Appel.

“It did. It did have charts. Did you get the charts for French Polynesia before you left?” asked Slow Boat Sailing.

“I think actually it had the entire Pacific Ocean to the California coast over to about the end of the Hawaiian Islands on it.”

Garmin chart plotters only have charts for the areas purchased by the owner. For example, the chart card named “VUS021R BlueChart g2 Vision West Coast Hawaii California-Mexico SD Card” does not cover French Polynesia, the Cooks, Kiribati, or Wake Island.

“So, like I said, the handheld [Garmin GPS] never quit. It always had a battery backup it was wonderful. The big one [Garmin GPS chart plotter] would quit because I have no idea why and we would just reset it and just turn it back on, but 100 percent of the time we use paper charts.”

Many times the electronic charts are identical to paper charts. It just depends on if the electronic chart used and the paper charts on board the vessel. For example, the USA and the UK have different paper charts that may be used for electronic charts. Navionics uses chart plotter soundings to update some of their electronic charts. Many paper charts were drawn prior to GPS positioning and are over a century old. Thus, large chart errors are possible whether they are paper or electronic.

Ms. Appel told Slow Boat Sailing that she did not have any electronic charts on the hand-held Garmin GPSMAP 76cx that she had on board.

She also told Slow Boat Sailing that she had never looked on her past bread crumb trail on the GPSMAP 76cx. She asserted on a Today Show interview with Matt Lauer that the handheld GPS would prove that they were not near Tahiti on June 15. The USCG said it made radio contact with the Sea Nymph. Ms. Appel told Slow Boat Sailing that the memory storage on the unit was unlikely to keep records that far back.

This bonus episode 42 of the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast is part of an interview exclusive to Slow Boat Sailing. To our knowledge, this is the first time Jennifer Appel has been interviewed by a sailboat owner since being rescued by the US Navy.

This interview highlight’s Ms. Appel’s lack of familiarity with much of the electrical navigation and communication gear on her boat. For example, Ms. Appel talks about the gear on board and often uses marine brand names to refer to pieces of electronics, assuming they manufacturer only makes one type of gear. Appel mentions that “ICOM” was an SSB. ICOM is an electronics manufacturer that makes both VHF and AIS transeivers in addition to SSB units. A similar exchange happens when Appel refers to “Furono,” which was the Sea Nymph‘s radar. Furuno makes GPS, fish finders, and chart plotters in addition to radar domes.

Ms. Appel has repeatedly said that she paid someone to install much of the new electronic gear. In this interview, she says, “I wholeheartedly espouse what Don Casey says in This Old Boat. You need to do your own work and don’t trust other people to do it for you. Because once they do something if you have no idea what they have done, then, by the time you realize there is a problem, you are so far behind the eight ball trying to fix it.  You might not even have the parts.”

Ms. Appel said, “The two things that I was not good at or had not had a large amount of expertise in were the rigging and the communications.”