Book and Movie by Famous Sailor Highlights Hurricanes Florence and Micheal’s Impact on Boaters

Late show host Stephen Colbert may be the most famous sailboat enthusiast in America whom you did not know owned a sailboat. He wrote a picture book Whose Boat Is This Boat? Comments That Don’t Help in the Aftermath of a Hurricane whose proceeds go to Hurricane Florence and Hurricane Micheal relief efforts. It is about Donald Trump’s visit to a beached sailboat in North Carolina after Florence. Below is the “movie” version:

TrumpBoat

The book description from Amazon says the following:

100% of The Late Show’s proceeds from this book go to hurricane relief.

Whose Boat Is This Boat? Comments That Don’t Help in the Aftermath of a Hurricane is a picture book made entirely of quotations from President Donald Trump in the wake of Hurricane Florence. It is the first children’s book that demonstrates what not to say after a natural disaster.

On September 19, 2018, Donald Trump paid a visit to New Bern, North Carolina, one of the towns ravaged by Hurricane Florence. It was there he showed deep concern for a boat that washed ashore. “At least you got a nice boat out of the deal,” said President Trump to hurricane victims. “Have a good time!” he told them. The only way his comments would be appropriate is in the context of a children’s book—and now you can experience them that way, thanks to the staff of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.

Whose Boat Is This Boat? is an excellent teaching tool for readers of all ages who enjoy learning about empathy by process of elimination. Have a good time!

At Slow Boat Sailing we covered the worst impacts on boaters of the two most devastating hurricanes to boaters to hit the United States in 2018 in the following two videos about Category 4 Hurricanes Florence and Michael. Below is footage from New Bern, NC, after Hurricane Florence.

We also covered the devastation in Panama City and Mexico Beach, Florida after Hurricane Micheal.

 

 

 

Advertisements

73-year-old plans round Cape Horn with broken rigging in the Golden Globe Race

Race leader Jean-Luc Van Den Heede broke a bolt that secured all his shrouds in a 150 degree knock down in a cyclonic storm. Instead of repairing it in the nearest port in Chile, the 73-year-old, 5-time circumnavigator plans to sail his 36-foot boat with a damaged rig around Cape Horn in a bid to complete the race with about 9,000 nautical miles to go until he reaches the race finish and his home port in Les Sables d’Olonne, France. In a satellite messages today, he said he climbed the mast twice today to tighten the loose shrouds on his Rustler 36 in two meter swells and no wind.

Rig

Caption: 2018 Golden Globe Race: Finnish skipper Tapio Lehtinen and his Gaia 36 yacht ASTERIA arrival at the Boatshed.com Hobart Film gate in 6th place in the Golden Globe Race. 1st place skipper Jean-Luc Van Den Heede has been climbing his mast at sea.

Here is the press release from yesterday UTC November 8, 2018:

Jean-Luc Van Den Heede, the embattled race leader struggling with a damaged mast sustained during a storm 1,900 miles west of Cape Horn, has decided to continue in the race back to Les Sables d’Olonne.

In a dramatic satellite phone call to Race Chairman Don McIntyre early today, the 73-year old solo circumnavigator who continues to enjoy a 1,500 mile lead over second placed Dutchman Mark Slats, said that he had decided to make the best repair he can at sea and continue in the race.

The Frenchman told McIntyre “The worst that can happen is that I lose my rig, and I have my jury rig at the ready. McIntyre added “At the moment, his only other option is to divert 2,000 miles off course to a Chilean port and be demoted to the Chichester Class for making one stop to affect repairs. He believes that if he can get round Cape Horn and start heading north up into the Atlantic there are many more ports of refuge that would be closer to hand, should he have further issues with the rig on his Rustler 36 Matmut.”

Don added. “This makes a real race to the finish. Mark Slats (Ohpen Maverick) has around 90 days to catch up and now needs to average 1 knot more than Jean-Luc over the remaining distance back to Les Sables d’Olonne. This means that Mark has a real incentive to beat Matmut on his own terms, while Jean-Luc must push as hard as he dare within the limits of his damaged mast”.

This is a far better proposition for the fiercely competitive Dutchman than by winning by default and have the result tarred, as Sir Robin Knox-Johnston did quite unjustly 50 years before with the words ‘but he only won because….(In RK-J’s case, Frenchman Bernard Moitessier who had been 19 days behind the Englishman at Cape Horn, decided to carry on for a second turn around the world ‘to save my soul’.)

Originally, Van Den Heede planned to drop out of the race that has lost most of its participants thus far. He broke race rules for using his satellite phone to call his manager and wife. Participants are not allowed to use their satellite phones to communicate with anyone besides race headquarters for reasons that don’t make sense to this author. Like Hungarian-born, American 5th place racer Istavan Kopar, Van Den Heede will get a time penalty for the infraction, according to race headquarters today, UTC November 9, 2018. If he had received “material assistance” over the satellite phone he could have been eliminated from the race.

Abandon ship MIRACLE 150nm from sailing circumnavigation, SV Kelaerin, lost & found

A USCG helicopter rescued Joy and Jim Carey 150 miles from crossing their outbound track on a 17-year sailing circumnavigation on June 18, 2018. They abandoned their 46-foot sailing vessel Kelaerin 180 miles west of Grays Harbor, Washington, after their boat was flooded with water and lost its electronics in a gale. They set off their EPIRB because they had no life raft, dinghy, or communications. They did not want their children to not know what happened to them a day from completing their 17-year, around the world trip in Bellingham, Washington.

This story had a happy ending when the USCG towed the yacht Kelaerin into Ft. Bragg, California a month later. Hear their amazing story in an exclusive interview with Jim and Joy Carey by Slow Boat Sailing.

BlueThumb16by9

WA, UNITED STATES
06.16.2018
Video by Petty Officer 1st Class Levi Read
U.S. Coast Guard District 13
An MH-60 Jayhawk aircrew, from Sector Columbia River, arrives on scene with the 46-foot sailing vessel Kelaerin 180 miles west of Grays Harbor, Wash., June 16, 2018.
The aircrew followed an electronic position indicating radio beacon signal registered to the sailing vessel and rescued the vessels two passengers.
U.S. Coast Guard video courtesy of Sector Columbia River.
This work, Sector Columbia River aircrew arrives on scene, by PO1 Levi Read
FORT BRAGG, CA, UNITED STATES
07.23.2018
Video by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sarah Wilson
U.S. Coast Guard District 11
This work, Coast Guard finds adrift sailboat 1 month after rescuing owners, by PO3 Sarah Wilson
FORT BRAGG, CA, UNITED STATES
07.23.2018
Video by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sarah Wilson
U.S. Coast Guard District 11
Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sarah Wilson
U.S. Coast Guard District 11
Coast Guard Cutter Barracuda crew members prepare to tow the unmanned 46-foot sailing vessel after finding it near Fort Bragg, Calif., July 22, 2018. The Coast Guard Cutter Barracuda crew found the vessel more than 440 miles south-southeast of its last known position near Grays Harbor, Washington, on June 18, when it was abandoned after a search-and-rescue case. (U.S. Coast Guard courtesy photo/released).
FORT BRAGG, CA, UNITED STATES
07.23.2018
Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sarah Wilson
U.S. Coast Guard District 11
A Coast Guard boat crew from Station Noyo River in Fort Bragg, Calif., tows an unmanned sailing vessel to the B Dock in Fort Bragg, July 23, 2018. The crew relieved the tow from the Coast Guard Cutter Barracuda crew, who found the vessel adrift off the coast of Fort Bragg on July 22. (U.S. Coast Guard courtesy video/released).
OCRACOKE, NC, UNITED STATES
08.07.2017
U.S. Coast Guard District 5
A Coast Guard HC-130 Hercules airplane crew from Air Station Elizabeth City, North Carolina, finds a distressed man aboard a sailboat waving his arms for help about five miles west of Portsmouth Island, North Carolina, Aug. 7, 2017. An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from the air station deployed a rescue swimmer, hoisted the man from the sailboat and brought him to The Outer Banks Hospital in Nags Head, North Carolina. (U.S. Coast Guard video by Air Station Elizabeth City/Released)
KITTY HAWK, NC, UNITED STATES
05.08.2013
Video by Petty Officer 3rd Class David Weydert
U.S. Coast Guard District 5
An MH-60 Jayhawk Helicopter aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City rescues man from sailboat 70 miles east of Kitty Hawk, NC.

The eBook of AROUND THE WORLD SINGLE-HANDED: The Cruise of the Islander is at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07C3THFZV
We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at http://www.mantusanchors.com/?affiliates=15
Mantus Anchors is a title sponsor of this video.Support the videos at
http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing
On the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast Linus Wilson has interviewed the crew of Sailing SV Delos, WhiteSpotPirates (Untie the Lines), Chase the Story Sailing, Gone with the Wynns, MJ Sailing, Sailing Doodles, SV Prism, Sailing Miss Lone Star, and many others.
Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:
Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook
and How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing
have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producers Anders Colbenson, Larry Wilson, Ted Royer, Kevin Yager, and Rick Moore (SSL).
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
music by http://www.BenSound.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

BREAKING: Race Leader knocked-down and out of the Golden Globe Race with a damaged rig

Jean-Luc Van Den Heede’s sailboat a Rustler 36-foot yacht named Matmut suffered a 150 degree knock down and its rig was damaged on UTC November 5, 2018. The French solo-sailor was 1,900 miles from Cape Horn. The shrouds are all loose because of a damaged bolt high on the mast that secures all four lower shrouds. The bolt slipped 5 centimeters down the mast after the knock-down. Van Den Heede plans to sail to Valparaiso, Chile and drop out of the race if his boat survives the violent storm its sailing through under bare poles.

JL-knock

The 73-year old French solo-sailor Van Den Heede is a five-time circumnavigator, but he is caught in chaotic sees and winds up to 65 knots and 12 meter seas in a cyclonic storm. He sails towards Cape Horn over 2,000 nautical miles ahead of his nearest competitor in the retro race for 32-to-36 foot sailing yachts that is the 2018 Golden Globe Race. Eighteen competitors started out from France in the solo-nonstop, unassisted race 127 days ago.

Four boats have been dismasted, three competitors have been rescued, and only eight boats remain in the race under the great capes. If Van Den Heede drops out in Valdivia, Chile, there will only be seven racers left. Van Den Heede has not yet asked for assistance. Second place Dutchman Mark Slats, who is closer to New Zealand than Chile, will lead the field of seven yachts if Van Den Heede drops out. The 1968 Golden Globe Race only had one finisher of nine boats leaving from England.

On his Golden Globe biography Van Den Heede said,

“From all my experiences, I am well aware of the difficulties this race poses. The slow speeds of these classic old boats with their long keels, the absence of weather information, the loss of all electronics and reliance on a sextant to plot positions, the lack of terrestrial contact, and the replacement of an electric pilot with wind vane self steering, will make this test even more random and difficult than the Vendée Globe.”

https://youtu.be/yof9BpbasCo

A crowded anchorage and a 4-hour trip that went a little long…

Our last stop in the Marquesas had a rolly anchorage exposed the SE trade wind swell. We went on a hike that went ten hours. Ua Pou was the first big sail with our new crew member Anna.  A surprising weather forecast forced us to depart the island in a big rush, and we would be forced to race offshore to beat a east moving front.

wrong

The eBook of AROUND THE WORLD SINGLE-HANDED: The Cruise of the Islander is at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07C3THFZV
We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at http://www.mantusanchors.com/?affiliates=15
Mantus Anchors is a title sponsor of this video.Support the videos at
http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing
On the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast Linus Wilson has interviewed the crew of Sailing SV Delos, WhiteSpotPirates (Untie the Lines), Chase the Story Sailing, Gone with the Wynns, MJ Sailing, Sailing Doodles, SV Prism, Sailing Miss Lone Star, and many others.
Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:
Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook
and How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing
have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producers Anders Colbenson, Larry Wilson, Ted Royer, Sam Balatsias, Kevin Yager, and Rick Moore (SSL).
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
music by http://www.BenSound.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

Susie Goodall drug anchor in Tasmania ahead of 60-knot storm.

A 60-knot storm is overtaking the middle of the 2018 Golden Globe Race fleet places 3rd to 6th. On early November 2, 2018, UTC, English solo-sailor Susie Goodall said she drug anchor in Safety Cove of Port Arthur Tasmania and texted, “Just wanna give up!!” 4th place Goodall may anchor for three days before preceding to cross the Southern Pacific Ocean in the solo, non-stop unassisted yacht race for 32-to-36-foot boats.

Drag.png

For storm anchoring over 50-knots Mantus Marine, a Slow Boat Sailing sponsor, advocates a 55-pound anchor for a 36-foot boat. Goodall has a 45-pound (20 kg) CQR, according to Don McIntyre the founder of the 2018 GGR. (Originally, GGR said she had a 35-pound, 16 kg, hook.) She also only has fifteen meters of chain, but an 65 meters of of rode onboard to put out. The depths are about 7 meters. The bottom is sandy. Since the winds are coming from the west, she will be blown to sea if she drags. That is better than being blown ashore. By late on November 3, 2018, UTC, the winds should moderate below gale force and Goodall can sail east towards New Zealand and the race leaders.

The situation for 6th place Tapio Lehtinen of Finland is not so rosy. He has to sail through the storm and somehow not sail past Hobart while keeping his boat upright in as much as 12-meter waves. He has gybed north and avoided being in the worst winds for a longer period, but it has put him well north of the course for Hobart and the film drop gate that all competitors must pass through. Lehtinen has some massive barnacles on his hull slowing him down. There is not as much circular movement likely to lead to confused seas in this storm as in the storms that overtook Goodall a week or so ago or the September storm that led to the rescue Abhilash Tomy and Gregor McGuckin.

5th place Istavan Kopar, the Hungarian-born American sought shelter in a Tasmanian bay prior to arrival at the Hobart film drop. The tracker at UTC November 2, 2018, 03:00 showed him anchored near Southport, southwest of the mandatory Hobart film drop that Goodall had left a few days before. The storm has shortened the distance between 5th place Kopar and 4th place Goodall.

Uku Randmaa in 3rd place near New Zealand will likely be overtaken by the low, but he will extend his substantial lead over Goodall if he escapes major incident. His strategy is mostly running further towards Cape Horn while his the chase is anchoring. The fastest two boats will be unaffected by the storm as will the 7th and 8th placed boats.

Sailing to Ua Pou from Nuka Hiva and Hiking to a Waterfall S2E16

Anna, Daly, and Linus go on their first sail to a new island together. They sail from Nuka Hiva to Ua Pou in the Marquesas Islands. Its a close-hauled, upwind sail. This is the sixth of six permanently inhabited islands in the Marquesas that Linus and Daly have visited in the Slow Boat.

Anna and Linus meet Jerome from Pukue’e Pension in Hakahau, Ua Pou and go on an all 4-hour hike to the waterfall near Hakahatau, which takes all day. Ua Pou is known for its jagged peaks.

A shrinking weather window to Tahiti forces them to set sail for Fakarava in the Tuamotos after only a two night stay. Linus has to meet his wife and daughter Janna and Sophie in Tahiti by July 1, 2017, and the Slow Boat Sailing crew is running out of time to get there.

UaPouThumb16by9

The eBook of AROUND THE WORLD SINGLE-HANDED: The Cruise of the Islander is at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07C3THFZV
We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at http://www.mantusanchors.com/?affiliates=15
Mantus Anchors is a title sponsor of this video.Support the videos at
http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing
On the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast Linus Wilson has interviewed the crew of Sailing SV Delos, WhiteSpotPirates (Untie the Lines), Chase the Story Sailing, Gone with the Wynns, MJ Sailing, Sailing Doodles, SV Prism, Sailing Miss Lone Star, and many others.
Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:
Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook
and How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing
have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producers Anders Colbenson, Larry Wilson, Ted Royer, Sam Balatsias, Kevin Yager, and Rick Moore (SSL).
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
music by http://www.BenSound.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018