Pirate SOS by Sailboat in Pacific Puddle Jump

 

71-year old Richard Carr wrote to his family that pirates were attacking him and their 36-foot sailboat. He was sailing 2,800 miles to the Marquesas and was over 1,100 miles from the nearest land 26-days into his solo trip from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and Hiva Oa, Marquesas on May 27, 2017. He was last heard of on May 28, 2017, when his Garmin, Delorme, InReach satellite texting device stopped working. He warned his family that he was being “kidnapped” by pirates. In this video, we explore this story of being lost at sea with Ali Carr Troxell. Ali Troxell analyzes the disturbing texts, the coast guard rescue efforts, Mr. Carr’s gear, background and experience. Captain Linus Wilson, OUPV-Near Coastal interviews Mr. Carr’s daughter and gives his take on the mystery as a sailor who has done the Marquesas passage. There are many lessons for potential offshore sailors in this video. It is a must watch.
Richard Carr was a lifelong sailor, but only recently bought his 1985, 36-foot Union Cutter sailboat, six years before departing. For much of his life he did not own a sailboat. He sold his prior yacht the Cortez when he had kids. With grandchildren and nearing retirement, he dreamed of sailing around the world. He sailed with a crew member in the Baja Ha-Ha before departing on his 2,800 solo trip.

You can see Ali Carr Troxell’s brave and well researched story at Outside Magazine:

November 12, 2018, “My Father’s SOS—From the Middle of the Sea”
https://www.outsideonline.com/2360811/mayday-fathers-disappearance-pirates

Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:
Slow Boat to the Bahamas

PirateSOSThumb16by9

Slow Boat to Cuba

https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook
and How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing
have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producers Anders Colbenson, Larry Wilson, Ted Royer, and Rick Moore (SSL).
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Oxriver Publishing, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

Advertisements

Shipwreck on Cocos Island by Captain Voss

Mac and I took the dinghy and pulled round to Wafer Bay, where the goods we had come for were supposed to be stored. After rounding a sharp, rocky promontory, Wafer Bay opened up, and a small house came in sight on the upper end of the right side of the bay. We made for it and landed a few yards from the building. Out of the house stepped a man of rather slim build. I should say that he was certainly six-feet-four inches in height. He had a beard hanging down from his chin which was about two feet long. The gentleman was followed by a small, pleasant looking lady.

Map1

On reaching us, the gentleman introduced himself as Mr. Giesler, Governor of Cocos Island, and the lady as his wife.

“Pleased to meet you, Mr. and Mrs. Giesler,” I said. This was not quite ninety-nine per cent true because I had nourished the hope that we should have the island to ourselves.

“Where do you come from?” asked the Governor.

“Victoria, B.C.,” I replied. “We made Chatham Bay this morning at daybreak, got becalmed, dropped anchor, and rowed round here in our dinghy.”

“You are after the treasure of course?” said Giesler.

“No, not that exactly,” I said. “We are just on a little pleasure cruise and thought we would come and have a look at the island.” (That was another lie).

“Of course, Mr. Giesler,” Mac said, “if you’ve got any gold bricks you don’t want, we don’t mind taking them along.”

Mrs. Giesler smiled at that and said gold bricks were very scarce on Cocos Island.

“Are they?” I said. “I thought you had lots of them.”

“Yes,” replied the Governor, “there are lots of them here, but we have got to find them first.”

Owing to Mr. Giesler’s size and appearance, I considered it advisable to keep on the right side of him. I therefore said, “Mr. Giesler, we have got a few days to spare. Will you allow us to prospect for the treasure, and if we find it, will you allow us to take it on board our vessel?”

“You can prospect as much as you like,” replied Mr. Giesler, “but of whatever you find you must give the Costa Rica Government one-third.”

I could see no way of avoiding this gift of one-third to the Costa Rican Government, so agreed to the Governor’s offer.

When everything was settled Mr. Giesler said, “Now you had better go and bring your vessel round here, and, by the way, how big is she?”

“Ten tons,” I said.

“Ten tons, well, well, well! And you came all the way from Victoria in a ten-ton vessel! Why, a ten-ton vessel will not hold even a fifth part of the gold that is buried here!”

We assured Mr. Giesler that we would probably be satisfied with ten tons of gold and a ton of diamonds. We would let him or the Costa Rican Government keep the rest. He seemed to be well satisfied and asked us to come into his house and have a drink. I have never been known to refuse a good thing. We followed Mr. and Mrs. Giesler into the house. In little more than ten minutes, Mrs. Giesler had a table set for us fit for a king. There was fine homemade bread and butter, ham, eggs, cold roast wild boar, and other things. This was in addition to the good breakfast that we had had before leaving the vessel. We put that on top of it and just about cleared up the table. When Mrs. Giesler saw all the empty dishes on the table, she asked me if we had plenty of provisions on board. Of course, I knew what she was alluding to.

Now let me give the landlubber just a little advice. Never offer a yachtsman anything to eat when he comes on shore, unless you mean it. A yachtsman when cruising is always hungry and doesn’t know how to say “no” when anything in the shape of eatables comes his way.

“What is the draught of your vessel.” asked Mr. Giesler.

“It’s just about four feet,” I replied.

“Is that all? Well, then, you can bring your vessel right up here to my house and tie her up to the trees.”

He then took me outside to show me where to put the vessel. Right at the head of Wafer Bay is a sand spit, which is about three hundred yards deep, between the higher land and deep water. It is about half a mile wide. On both sides, there is high land. At high tide, the sand spit is about three feet under water. On the right side, when coming into the bay and within a few yards of Giesler’s house, there is a stream coming down from the mountains. Just alongside, it is large and deep enough for the Xora to lay comfortably. The stream had washed a hollow through the sand spit, which the Governor claimed sufficiently large to allow our boat to pass through. I, of course, took his word for it, especially as the man said he had been on the island for eighteen years. He knew all the ins and outs of the place. The only thing that he did not know, he said, was where the gold was hidden.

“We will find that easy enough,” Mac said.

It was then about ten o’clock. As Mr. Giesler said it would be high water at noon, Mac and I went back in our dinghy to bring the Xora around. That would allow us to cross the spit at high tide. A nice little breeze had sprung up from the west, and, with a small sail set in our dinghy, we were soon alongside the sloop. Jack, in the meantime, had been fishing. He was busy frying some of his catch, grumbling all the while that the fish refused to bite.

“And how did you catch these fish if they didn’t bite?” asked Mac.

“I went down and hooked them on,” was Jack’s reply.

“Come along here, now, and get up the anchor and set sail and have your growl afterwards,” I said. As my two shipmates were always right on hand when I said the word, we had our anchor up and sail set in no time. With the centreboard down, we beat up against the westerly breeze to Wafer Bay.

On rounding the rocky point, we saw Giesler hoisting the Costa Rican flag, which he had informed us would be a sign that the water was high enough for the Xora to cross the sand spit. I at once directed my course for the channel, and everything went fine until we got about half way across the spit. Then, she struck a rock, and, in less time than I can write it down, the sloop filled with water. We did not even have time to save our provisions much of which was spoiled by the sea water. The sails were lowered at once. We tried hard to get the vessel off but were unable to move her.

I felt like shooting the Governor, and I think we would have shot him if it had not been for his wife. All three of us had murder in our hearts.

ABOVE WAS A SELECTION FROM SAILING TO TREASURE ISLAND: THE CRUISE OF THE XORA BY CAPTAIN J.C. VOSS EDITED AND ANNOTATED BY LINUS WILSON. YOU CAN BUY THE EBOOKPAPERBACK, OR AUDIOBOOK. THEY ALL MAKE GREAT GIFTS FOR YOUR FAVORITE SAILOR.

 

 

Sailing for Pirate GOLD | Cap’n Voss’ Treasure Island

Legendary sailor Captain J. C. Voss meets a man in his hotel in Victoria, British Columbia in 1897. The mystery man tells a tale of pirate treasure and Voss must get a sailboat to find the gold.

The mystery man says he knows where tons of gold and jewels are buried on the remote Cocos Island. Voss takes a 35-foot sailing sloop seven thousand miles through gales in search of the pirate Treasure of Lima worth seven thousand pounds sterling in 1897 or over $200 million today.

GoldThumb

Linus Wilson reads the first four chapters of Sailing to Treasure Island by Captain John C. Voss. You can get the full audiobook at

http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

The paperback at

http://www.lulu.com/shop/captain-jc-voss/sailing-to-treasure-island-the-cruise-of-the-xora/paperback/product-23887731.html

or the eBook at

http://www.lulu.com/shop/captain-jc-voss/sailing-to-treasure-island-the-cruise-of-the-xora/ebook/product-23887490.html

Legendary sailor Captain J. C. Voss meets a mysterious man in his hotel in Victoria, British Columbia in 1897. The mystery man says he knows where tons of gold and jewels are buried on the remote Cocos Island. Voss takes a 35-foot sailing sloop seven thousand miles through gales in search of the pirate Treasure of Lima worth seven thousand pounds sterling in 1897 or over $200 million today.

*This is an edited, abridged, and annotated version of the first section of the Venturesome Voyages of Captain Voss concerning the voyage of the XORA sloop. This is the only part of that work focused on treasure hunting.
*In the 2018 edition, the text is extensively edited as the first edition from 1913 had many run-on sentences and poor subject and verb agreement.
*A biography of the great mariner Captain J.C. Voss is written by the editor.
*Frequent footnotes and an editor’s note put the text in historic context.
*This is an abridged version of the VENTURESOME VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN VOSS. This abridged version focuses exclusively on the cruise of the sailboat XORA and treasure hunting aboard it. Most of the VENTURESOME VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN VOSS is about the voyage of the sailing canoe named TILIKUM.

Below are some selections from the book:
“My seafaring life commenced in the year 1877, when I was quite a young man. Up to the time that I sailed in the Xora, it was spent in large sailing vessels. During this period, I have filled all sorts of positions from deck boy up to master.
Throughout all those years, I would certainly not have believed that a vessel so small as the Xora could live through a heavy gale at sea. Naturally enough, I should not have thought of attempting a long sea voyage in any small craft if it not been for a gentleman, whose name was George Haffner, an American citizen.

In the summer of 1897, when I was sitting comfortably in an easy chair in the Queen’s Hotel, Victoria, British Columbia, a gentleman stepped up to me, saying, “Are you Captain Voss?” I replied in the affirmative. He then introduced himself as Mr. Haffner, handing me at the same time a letter, saying that it was from an old friend of mine, whose death had taken place at sea just fourteen days previously, and with whom he had stayed during his last moments.”

“…The bearer of this note is Mr. George Haffner, who knows the position where the great treasure lies on Cocos Island. Believe in him, and he will make you a rich man. Excuse my short note, because I am very weak. Kindly remember me to all my old friends and believe me.
Your dying friend,
JIM DEMPSTER”

Captain Voss is one of the early pioneers of long-distance sailboat cruising. He is the first major author in the genre of the sailing narrative write about his travels under sail after Captain Joshua Slocum. He is more famous for his 40,000-mile voyage in a sailing canoe named TILIKUM, but this treasure hunting adventure under sail is a book that will delight all readers.

Oxriver Publishing produces titles of interest to sailboat cruising enthusiasts. This is an annotated and modernized version of Captain Voss’ classic account in the VENTURESOME VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN VOSS, which includes an editor’s note and biography of John C. Voss by Dr. Linus Wilson. The editor is the creator of the Slow Boat Sailing YouTube Channel and Podcast as well as the author of several sailing books.

The eBook of AROUND THE WORLD SINGLE-HANDED: The Cruise of the Islander is at https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B07C3THFZV
Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:
Slow Boat to the Bahamas
Slow Boat to Cuba
https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook
and How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing
have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producers Anders Colbenson, Larry Wilson, Ted Royer, and Rick Moore (SSL).
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Oxriver Publishing, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

CHAPTER I: A CHANCE OF A LIFETIME—SEVEN MILLION POUNDS STERLING by Capt. J.C. Voss

My seafaring life commenced in the year 1877, when I was quite a young man. Up to the time that I sailed in the Xora, it was spent in large sailing vessels.  During this period, I have filled all sorts of positions from deck boy up to master.

Pirate Gold

Throughout all those years, I would certainly not have believed that a vessel so small as the Xora could live through a heavy gale at sea. Naturally enough, I should not have thought of attempting a long sea voyage in any small craft if it not been for a gentleman, whose name was George Haffner, an American citizen.

In the summer of 1897, when I was sitting comfortably in an easy chair in the Queen’s Hotel, Victoria, British Columbia, a gentleman stepped up to me, saying, “Are you Captain Voss?” I replied in the affirmative. He then introduced himself as Mr. Haffner, handing me at the same time a letter, saying that it was from an old friend of mine, whose death had taken place at sea just fourteen days previously, and with whom he had stayed during his last moments.

The letter ran as follows:

Dear friend John,

You will be surprised to learn that I am now lying on my deathbed. Yes, dear friend, we are at present a long way out on the Pacific Ocean, and I shall never be able to see land any more, but shall be buried at sea like a dog, and the Pacific Ocean will be my grave.

The bearer of this note is Mr. George Haffner, who knows the position where the great treasure lies on Cocos Island. Believe in him, and he will make you a rich man. Excuse my short note, because I am very weak. Kindly remember me to all my old friends and believe me.

Your dying friend,

JIM DEMPSTER

About five months previous to this meeting with Haffner, a Victoria sealing schooner of about seventy-five tons had been chartered by several enterprising men of Victoria, of whom Dempster was one, for the purpose of sailing down to Cocos Island to make a search for the great treasure, supposed to be buried on that island.

Haffner was in possession of a permit, issued by the Costa Rica government, to secure the treasure if found by him. He stated that, when this sealing schooner—the Aurora—arrived at Cocos Island, he had already been on the island for nine months. During which time, he had vigorously searched for the treasure and had located it.

Surprised at this, I asked him dubiously, why he had not taken the treasure back to Victoria in the Aurora. He explained that having arrived at Cocos Island by the Costa Rica supply boat which undertakes a trip every six months to supply the guard on the island with provisions, he met the crew of the Aurora. Not knowing anything of their intentions, besides not liking the captain, he did not feel disposed to disclose his secret as to where the treasure was buried.

He continued:

Meanwhile the crew of the Aurora worked with all their might and made excavations in many places without, however, having the slightest success. Finally, the men got tired and dissatisfied at having come on a wild goose chase. Besides, their provisions ran short. So, they were compelled to return to Victoria, giving me a passage at the same time.

Shortly after our departure from Cocos Island, Dempster became ill, and as a passenger on board I volunteered to nurse him. I did all I possibly could for him, but he grew worse and worse, so that it was soon plain to me that he would shortly succumb.

Not knowing anybody in Victoria and not being sailor myself, I thought of getting in touch with a responsible person in Victoria who would join me on an expedition to Cocos Island to bring away the treasure. So, I decided to confide the news that I had found the treasure to Dempster.

Greatly surprised at this, he almost gained new life, but realised later that his end was near. He himself could not profit by my communication.

I then asked Dempster to give me the name of a reliable man in Victoria, who would be in a position to procure for me a suitable vessel and crew with which to sail to Cocos Island and carry off the treasure. He mentioned your name and wrote the letter which I have just handed to you.

Because I had found from the day that I first met Dempster on Cocos Island until he died that he was a straightforward and reliable man, I have decided to place confidence in you. I now ask, “Can you and will you procure for me a vessel, fit her out properly, sail with me to Cocos Island, assist me to put the treasure on board, and take it to Victoria?” As compensation, I offer you one-third of whatever we may secure of the treasure. This would be the same as my own share because we have to hand over one-third to the Costa Rica Government.

To my query, Haffner then explained that the treasure was valued at over seven million pounds sterling. Thus, each share would amount to, say, £2,333,000. The treasure consisted principally of gold ingots. Thus, the total quantity of this gold would weigh approximately fifty tons and measure roughly one hundred cubic feet. [1]

Turning these gigantic figures over in my mind, my brain almost became dizzy. At last, at last, I thought to myself, “Your poor old daddy’s words will come true!”

He often told me in a joking way, “When you grow up, John, I shall make a millionaire of you.”

When I was about sixteen years of age and reminded him of his promise, he thought it would cost too much money. He recommended to me to go out into the world and hustle for the million myself. He told me that, if I kept on hustling well and hard, I would certainly succeed in becoming a millionaire.

Of course, like a good son, I took my father’s advice and went to sea. From then until the day I met Haffner, I had been hustling up and down and all round the world. I never had managed to commence becoming a millionaire, even in Japanese sea. As I was then already past forty years of age, I had almost lost confidence in my father’s prophecy prior to meeting Haffner.

This gentleman explained to me in detail where the treasure was buried and showed me a chart of the island. It had cross bearings marked on it to give the position.[2]

All that Haffner said appeared to me so simple and straightforward that I certainly arrived at the conclusion that my fortune was made and that I should in reality become a millionaire. I would be one not only in cents or dollars but also in pounds sterling. I would be a double header at that.

What a grand feeling came over me, a poor man, firmly believing that I would be soon the possessor of millions. The thought of which was with me day and night.

I dreamt, the first night after meeting Haffner, that we were both standing on Cocos Island near a large cave, out of which glittering gold and sparkling diamonds were shining invitingly.

To cut a long story short, I really felt the happiest man in the wide world. I did not fail to have a good time in advance at the prospect of becoming a real millionaire.

In the meantime, I was looking round for a suitable vessel, and found a hundred-ton schooner. Haffner, however, did not quite approve of it, thinking it was not really fit to carry such a valuable cargo. One fine day he said that the vessel was unsuitable. He had luckily, for him, met Admiral Pallister of the Northwest British Squadron. The Admiral had agreed to make a trip to Cocos Island. Under the guidance of Haffner, Admiral Pallister would bring the treasure to Victoria in his flagship, the Imperieuse.

This news struck me like a thunderbolt. “Well, in that case,” I said, “I suppose I am out of it?”

“Very sorry indeed,” he replied, “but I am sure you understand my position. In order to secure the treasure with safety I must have a good ship, and, what is more essential, protection, neither of which you can afford me. By placing myself in the hands of Admiral Pallister, I shall have both.”

I saw that Haffner was right, and probably should have done the same had I been in his position. However, I felt truly miserable. I felt as if I had lost my mental balance. All the castles I had already built in the air had vanished with this sudden blow. What was worse was that I had spent quite a little of my savings. So, the tide of my banking account was at a low ebb.

After leaving Haffner, I would not at first believe his story that a British man-of-war should undertake such an expedition. But it proved to be true when Admiral Pallister left Esquimalt Harbour in his flagship Imperieuse with Haffner on board. It even was escorted by a cruiser for the south.

So, I thought to myself that, instead of being on the road to fortune, I have to hustle again and harder than ever before. I solemnly vowed that I would never again build castles in the air. Nor would I have a good time and spend money in advance on the strength of promise of good prospects. In the future, I would wait until I actually had the cash in hand.

[1] Editor’s Note: This meeting in 1897 was in the middle of the 1896 to 1899 Klondike Gold Rush. Gold fever was motivating many men at this time.

[2] The similarities of the outlines of this story to the runaway success Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson originally published in book form in 1883 are unmistakable.

Above was a selection from Sailing to Treasure Island: The Cruisie of the Xora by Captain J.C. Voss edited and Annotated by Linus Wilson. You can buy the eBook, paperback, or audiobook. They all make great gifts for your favorite sailor.

Ep. 54: Capt. Voss, Sailing to Treasure Island: The Cruise of the Xora read by Linus Wilson

VossThumb

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-3wnn8-a03c40

Linus Wilson reads the first four chapters of Sailing to Treasure Island by Captain John C. Voss. You can get the full audiobook at

www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

The paperback at

http://www.lulu.com/shop/captain-jc-voss/sailing-to-treasure-island-the-cruise-of-the-xora/paperback/product-23887731.html

or the eBook at

http://www.lulu.com/shop/captain-jc-voss/sailing-to-treasure-island-the-cruise-of-the-xora/ebook/product-23887490.html

Legendary sailor Captain J. C. Voss meets a mysterious man in his hotel in Victoria, British Columbia in 1897. The mystery man says he knows where tons of gold and jewels are buried on the remote Cocos Island. Voss takes a 35-foot sailing sloop seven thousand miles through gales in search of the pirate Treasure of Lima worth seven thousand pounds sterling in 1897 or over $200 million today.

*This is an edited, abridged, and annotated version of the first section of the Venturesome Voyages of Captain Voss concerning the voyage of the XORA sloop. This is the only part of that work focused on treasure hunting.
*In the 2018 edition, the text is extensively edited as the first edition from 1913 had many run-on sentences and poor subject and verb agreement.
*A biography of the great mariner Captain J.C. Voss is written by the editor.
*Frequent footnotes and an editor’s note put the text in historic context.
*This is an abridged version of the VENTURESOME VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN VOSS. This abridged version focuses exclusively on the cruise of the sailboat XORA and treasure hunting aboard it. Most of the VENTURESOME VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN VOSS is about the voyage of the sailing canoe named TILIKUM.

Below are some selections from the book:
“My seafaring life commenced in the year 1877, when I was quite a young man. Up to the time that I sailed in the Xora, it was spent in large sailing vessels. During this period, I have filled all sorts of positions from deck boy up to master.
Throughout all those years, I would certainly not have believed that a vessel so small as the Xora could live through a heavy gale at sea. Naturally enough, I should not have thought of attempting a long sea voyage in any small craft if it not been for a gentleman, whose name was George Haffner, an American citizen.

In the summer of 1897, when I was sitting comfortably in an easy chair in the Queen’s Hotel, Victoria, British Columbia, a gentleman stepped up to me, saying, “Are you Captain Voss?” I replied in the affirmative. He then introduced himself as Mr. Haffner, handing me at the same time a letter, saying that it was from an old friend of mine, whose death had taken place at sea just fourteen days previously, and with whom he had stayed during his last moments.”

“…The bearer of this note is Mr. George Haffner, who knows the position where the great treasure lies on Cocos Island. Believe in him, and he will make you a rich man. Excuse my short note, because I am very weak. Kindly remember me to all my old friends and believe me.
Your dying friend,
JIM DEMPSTER”

Captain Voss is one of the early pioneers of long-distance sailboat cruising. He is the first major author in the genre of the sailing narrative write about his travels under sail after Captain Joshua Slocum. He is more famous for his 40,000-mile voyage in a sailing canoe named TILIKUM, but this treasure hunting adventure under sail is a book that will delight all readers.

Oxriver Publishing produces titles of interest to sailboat cruising enthusiasts. This is an annotated and modernized version of Captain Voss’ classic account in the VENTURESOME VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN VOSS, which includes an editor’s note and biography of John C. Voss by Dr. Linus Wilson. The editor is the creator of the Slow Boat Sailing YouTube Channel and Podcast as well as the author of several sailing books.
Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:
Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook
and How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing
have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producers Anders Colbenson, Larry Wilson, Ted Royer, and Rick Moore (SSL).
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Oxriver Publishing, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

Book and Movie by Famous Sailor Highlights Hurricanes Florence and Micheal’s Impact on Boaters

Late show host Stephen Colbert may be the most famous sailboat enthusiast in America whom you did not know owned a sailboat. He wrote a picture book Whose Boat Is This Boat? Comments That Don’t Help in the Aftermath of a Hurricane whose proceeds go to Hurricane Florence and Hurricane Micheal relief efforts. It is about Donald Trump’s visit to a beached sailboat in North Carolina after Florence. Below is the “movie” version:

TrumpBoat

The book description from Amazon says the following:

100% of The Late Show’s proceeds from this book go to hurricane relief.

Whose Boat Is This Boat? Comments That Don’t Help in the Aftermath of a Hurricane is a picture book made entirely of quotations from President Donald Trump in the wake of Hurricane Florence. It is the first children’s book that demonstrates what not to say after a natural disaster.

On September 19, 2018, Donald Trump paid a visit to New Bern, North Carolina, one of the towns ravaged by Hurricane Florence. It was there he showed deep concern for a boat that washed ashore. “At least you got a nice boat out of the deal,” said President Trump to hurricane victims. “Have a good time!” he told them. The only way his comments would be appropriate is in the context of a children’s book—and now you can experience them that way, thanks to the staff of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.

Whose Boat Is This Boat? is an excellent teaching tool for readers of all ages who enjoy learning about empathy by process of elimination. Have a good time!

At Slow Boat Sailing we covered the worst impacts on boaters of the two most devastating hurricanes to boaters to hit the United States in 2018 in the following two videos about Category 4 Hurricanes Florence and Michael. Below is footage from New Bern, NC, after Hurricane Florence.

We also covered the devastation in Panama City and Mexico Beach, Florida after Hurricane Micheal.

 

 

 

73-year-old plans round Cape Horn with broken rigging in the Golden Globe Race

Race leader Jean-Luc Van Den Heede broke a bolt that secured all his shrouds in a 150 degree knock down in a cyclonic storm. Instead of repairing it in the nearest port in Chile, the 73-year-old, 5-time circumnavigator plans to sail his 36-foot boat with a damaged rig around Cape Horn in a bid to complete the race with about 9,000 nautical miles to go until he reaches the race finish and his home port in Les Sables d’Olonne, France. In a satellite messages today, he said he climbed the mast twice today to tighten the loose shrouds on his Rustler 36 in two meter swells and no wind.

Rig

Caption: 2018 Golden Globe Race: Finnish skipper Tapio Lehtinen and his Gaia 36 yacht ASTERIA arrival at the Boatshed.com Hobart Film gate in 6th place in the Golden Globe Race. 1st place skipper Jean-Luc Van Den Heede has been climbing his mast at sea.

Here is the press release from yesterday UTC November 8, 2018:

Jean-Luc Van Den Heede, the embattled race leader struggling with a damaged mast sustained during a storm 1,900 miles west of Cape Horn, has decided to continue in the race back to Les Sables d’Olonne.

In a dramatic satellite phone call to Race Chairman Don McIntyre early today, the 73-year old solo circumnavigator who continues to enjoy a 1,500 mile lead over second placed Dutchman Mark Slats, said that he had decided to make the best repair he can at sea and continue in the race.

The Frenchman told McIntyre “The worst that can happen is that I lose my rig, and I have my jury rig at the ready. McIntyre added “At the moment, his only other option is to divert 2,000 miles off course to a Chilean port and be demoted to the Chichester Class for making one stop to affect repairs. He believes that if he can get round Cape Horn and start heading north up into the Atlantic there are many more ports of refuge that would be closer to hand, should he have further issues with the rig on his Rustler 36 Matmut.”

Don added. “This makes a real race to the finish. Mark Slats (Ohpen Maverick) has around 90 days to catch up and now needs to average 1 knot more than Jean-Luc over the remaining distance back to Les Sables d’Olonne. This means that Mark has a real incentive to beat Matmut on his own terms, while Jean-Luc must push as hard as he dare within the limits of his damaged mast”.

This is a far better proposition for the fiercely competitive Dutchman than by winning by default and have the result tarred, as Sir Robin Knox-Johnston did quite unjustly 50 years before with the words ‘but he only won because….(In RK-J’s case, Frenchman Bernard Moitessier who had been 19 days behind the Englishman at Cape Horn, decided to carry on for a second turn around the world ‘to save my soul’.)

Originally, Van Den Heede planned to drop out of the race that has lost most of its participants thus far. He broke race rules for using his satellite phone to call his manager and wife. Participants are not allowed to use their satellite phones to communicate with anyone besides race headquarters for reasons that don’t make sense to this author. Like Hungarian-born, American 5th place racer Istavan Kopar, Van Den Heede will get a time penalty for the infraction, according to race headquarters today, UTC November 9, 2018. If he had received “material assistance” over the satellite phone he could have been eliminated from the race.

Abandon ship MIRACLE 150nm from sailing circumnavigation, SV Kelaerin, lost & found

A USCG helicopter rescued Joy and Jim Carey 150 miles from crossing their outbound track on a 17-year sailing circumnavigation on June 18, 2018. They abandoned their 46-foot sailing vessel Kelaerin 180 miles west of Grays Harbor, Washington, after their boat was flooded with water and lost its electronics in a gale. They set off their EPIRB because they had no life raft, dinghy, or communications. They did not want their children to not know what happened to them a day from completing their 17-year, around the world trip in Bellingham, Washington.

This story had a happy ending when the USCG towed the yacht Kelaerin into Ft. Bragg, California a month later. Hear their amazing story in an exclusive interview with Jim and Joy Carey by Slow Boat Sailing.

BlueThumb16by9

WA, UNITED STATES
06.16.2018
Video by Petty Officer 1st Class Levi Read
U.S. Coast Guard District 13
An MH-60 Jayhawk aircrew, from Sector Columbia River, arrives on scene with the 46-foot sailing vessel Kelaerin 180 miles west of Grays Harbor, Wash., June 16, 2018.
The aircrew followed an electronic position indicating radio beacon signal registered to the sailing vessel and rescued the vessels two passengers.
U.S. Coast Guard video courtesy of Sector Columbia River.
This work, Sector Columbia River aircrew arrives on scene, by PO1 Levi Read
FORT BRAGG, CA, UNITED STATES
07.23.2018
Video by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sarah Wilson
U.S. Coast Guard District 11
This work, Coast Guard finds adrift sailboat 1 month after rescuing owners, by PO3 Sarah Wilson
FORT BRAGG, CA, UNITED STATES
07.23.2018
Video by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sarah Wilson
U.S. Coast Guard District 11
Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sarah Wilson
U.S. Coast Guard District 11
Coast Guard Cutter Barracuda crew members prepare to tow the unmanned 46-foot sailing vessel after finding it near Fort Bragg, Calif., July 22, 2018. The Coast Guard Cutter Barracuda crew found the vessel more than 440 miles south-southeast of its last known position near Grays Harbor, Washington, on June 18, when it was abandoned after a search-and-rescue case. (U.S. Coast Guard courtesy photo/released).
FORT BRAGG, CA, UNITED STATES
07.23.2018
Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sarah Wilson
U.S. Coast Guard District 11
A Coast Guard boat crew from Station Noyo River in Fort Bragg, Calif., tows an unmanned sailing vessel to the B Dock in Fort Bragg, July 23, 2018. The crew relieved the tow from the Coast Guard Cutter Barracuda crew, who found the vessel adrift off the coast of Fort Bragg on July 22. (U.S. Coast Guard courtesy video/released).
OCRACOKE, NC, UNITED STATES
08.07.2017
U.S. Coast Guard District 5
A Coast Guard HC-130 Hercules airplane crew from Air Station Elizabeth City, North Carolina, finds a distressed man aboard a sailboat waving his arms for help about five miles west of Portsmouth Island, North Carolina, Aug. 7, 2017. An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from the air station deployed a rescue swimmer, hoisted the man from the sailboat and brought him to The Outer Banks Hospital in Nags Head, North Carolina. (U.S. Coast Guard video by Air Station Elizabeth City/Released)
KITTY HAWK, NC, UNITED STATES
05.08.2013
Video by Petty Officer 3rd Class David Weydert
U.S. Coast Guard District 5
An MH-60 Jayhawk Helicopter aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City rescues man from sailboat 70 miles east of Kitty Hawk, NC.

The eBook of AROUND THE WORLD SINGLE-HANDED: The Cruise of the Islander is at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07C3THFZV
We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at http://www.mantusanchors.com/?affiliates=15
Mantus Anchors is a title sponsor of this video.Support the videos at
http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing
On the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast Linus Wilson has interviewed the crew of Sailing SV Delos, WhiteSpotPirates (Untie the Lines), Chase the Story Sailing, Gone with the Wynns, MJ Sailing, Sailing Doodles, SV Prism, Sailing Miss Lone Star, and many others.
Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:
Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook
and How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing
have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producers Anders Colbenson, Larry Wilson, Ted Royer, Kevin Yager, and Rick Moore (SSL).
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
music by http://www.BenSound.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

BREAKING: Race Leader knocked-down and out of the Golden Globe Race with a damaged rig

Jean-Luc Van Den Heede’s sailboat a Rustler 36-foot yacht named Matmut suffered a 150 degree knock down and its rig was damaged on UTC November 5, 2018. The French solo-sailor was 1,900 miles from Cape Horn. The shrouds are all loose because of a damaged bolt high on the mast that secures all four lower shrouds. The bolt slipped 5 centimeters down the mast after the knock-down. Van Den Heede plans to sail to Valparaiso, Chile and drop out of the race if his boat survives the violent storm its sailing through under bare poles.

JL-knock

The 73-year old French solo-sailor Van Den Heede is a five-time circumnavigator, but he is caught in chaotic sees and winds up to 65 knots and 12 meter seas in a cyclonic storm. He sails towards Cape Horn over 2,000 nautical miles ahead of his nearest competitor in the retro race for 32-to-36 foot sailing yachts that is the 2018 Golden Globe Race. Eighteen competitors started out from France in the solo-nonstop, unassisted race 127 days ago.

Four boats have been dismasted, three competitors have been rescued, and only eight boats remain in the race under the great capes. If Van Den Heede drops out in Valdivia, Chile, there will only be seven racers left. Van Den Heede has not yet asked for assistance. Second place Dutchman Mark Slats, who is closer to New Zealand than Chile, will lead the field of seven yachts if Van Den Heede drops out. The 1968 Golden Globe Race only had one finisher of nine boats leaving from England.

On his Golden Globe biography Van Den Heede said,

“From all my experiences, I am well aware of the difficulties this race poses. The slow speeds of these classic old boats with their long keels, the absence of weather information, the loss of all electronics and reliance on a sextant to plot positions, the lack of terrestrial contact, and the replacement of an electric pilot with wind vane self steering, will make this test even more random and difficult than the Vendée Globe.”

https://youtu.be/yof9BpbasCo

A crowded anchorage and a 4-hour trip that went a little long…

Our last stop in the Marquesas had a rolly anchorage exposed the SE trade wind swell. We went on a hike that went ten hours. Ua Pou was the first big sail with our new crew member Anna.  A surprising weather forecast forced us to depart the island in a big rush, and we would be forced to race offshore to beat a east moving front.

wrong

The eBook of AROUND THE WORLD SINGLE-HANDED: The Cruise of the Islander is at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07C3THFZV
We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at http://www.mantusanchors.com/?affiliates=15
Mantus Anchors is a title sponsor of this video.Support the videos at
http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing
On the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast Linus Wilson has interviewed the crew of Sailing SV Delos, WhiteSpotPirates (Untie the Lines), Chase the Story Sailing, Gone with the Wynns, MJ Sailing, Sailing Doodles, SV Prism, Sailing Miss Lone Star, and many others.
Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:
Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook
and How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing
have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producers Anders Colbenson, Larry Wilson, Ted Royer, Sam Balatsias, Kevin Yager, and Rick Moore (SSL).
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
music by http://www.BenSound.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018