Move Over Sailing La Vagabonde! Dylan Magaster Wants to Be the Top Sailing Vlogger.

Dylan Magaster and his YouTube channel of the same name wants to buy a boat in the Med and take his 368K subscribers with him. You can join his motley crew if you win his video competition.

Sailing La Vagabonde just vacated the Med for the Caribbean as part of their northbound swing to the East Coast of the USA. Sailing La Vagabonde has about 380K subscribers and has the edge on subscribers and of owning a boat. Slow Boat Sailing Podcast episode 10 and 33 guests Sailing SV Delos is also in the Caribbean with a future route unknown, and they lead all sailing vloggers in terms of total views and have over 200K subscribers and climbing:

I think Dylan has zero sailing experience except for the sailing he did with the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast guest, Bobby White, of Sailing Doodles. The video is below:

Dylan is not the first top travel vlogger to switch to sailing and its seemingly more lucrative Patreon audience and ad revenues. The bummer is that owning a boat is more expensive than owning a van or RV, and has a much steeper learning curve. Slow Boat Sailing Podcast episode 48 guests (coming out in May 2018) Gone with the Wynns are sailing around the world in a catamaran after selling their RV.

cats

The Wynns took sailing lessons and paid a captain soon after buying their awesome catamaran. If you are in the market for a sailing catamaran, watch this video FIRST.

P.S. The Cheeky Monkey owned by the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast’s episode 29 guests is for sale in Oz if you are interested. It was a sweet boat from our view just behind it in Papeete Marina in Tahiti!

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The Terror on AMC: Northwest Passage Sailing Mystery’s Episodes 1-4 Cliff Notes

 - The Terror _ Season 1, Episode 1 - Photo Credit: AMC

Inspired by a true story, The Terror is a suspenseful mystery centering on a Royal Navy crew’s harrowing voyage into uncharted territory as they attempt to discover the Northwest Passage in 1845.

This AMC series comes out on Mondays at 9PM eastern and pacific time. The first three episodes of a ten episode season one have been aired. Will anyone survive to see season 2? We’ll dive into the AMC press kit so you’ll get up to speed on the story and be ready for episode 4 coming out on Monday, April 9, 2018.

Faced with treacherous conditions, disease, limited resources, impending starvation, dwindling hope and fear of the unknown, the crew is pushed to the brink of extinction. Cold, isolated and stuck at the end of the earth, the seamen also face a mysterious threat by something out in the frigid darkness that is stalking their ship, snatching one man at a time and leaving bodies mangled or missing. The Terror is an extreme tale of human survival and a “what if?” of epic proportions, revealing what hubris against nature can cost you.

The real expedition, which led to more than 120 crew members inexplicably disappearing, has warranted a great deal of speculation ever since. Their fate is one of the enduring mysteries of the age of exploration. After almost 175 years of searching, the ships were discovered coincidentally by Arctic research groups in 2014 and 2016.

EPISODE 101: “GO FOR BROKE” Sir John Franklin’s Arctic expedition finds itself within two hundred miles of finally discovering the Northwest Passage when an accident at sea cripples one of its two ships. Sir John must make a difficult choice that could either seal their bid for glory or doom them.

EPISODE 102: “GORE” Having spent a long winter trapped in the ice, spring arrives and an optimistic Sir John sends scouting parties out to search for open water. But one of the parties makes an unsettling discovery and finds itself the target of a vicious predator.

EPISODE 103: “THE LADDER” With the “thing on the ice” now stalking the ships, Captain Francis Crozier tries to convince Sir John to send out a rescue party to attempt to alert the world of their situation, pitting Crozier’s loyalty to his commander against his duty to his crew.

EPISODE 104: “PUNISHED, AS A BOY” With the arrival of another winter, a frightening attack on the ships proves to the men they are not battling an ordinary bear. Whatever is hunting them is cunning, and driving the men to panic. The expedition’s officers are forced to consider that the region’s Inuit culture may hold the key to their survival or demise.

CROWHURST v. CHICHESTER, Colin Firth in THE MERCY | Sailing Movie Boat Show Clip Reaction

Colin Firth as Donald Crowhurst comes face to face with Sir Francis Chichester his hero and later detractor in a clip from THE MERCY film. This is a YouTube premier for this clip where two sailing legends face off and Linus Wilson of Slow Boat Sailing reacts to this amazing scene. The Mercy stars Colin Firth as Donald Crowhurst and Rachel Weisz as his wife Clare.

The movie debuts in 9 February 2018 in the UK. It is planned to be distributed by Village Roadshow in the USA later in 2018. This movie has big time Academy Award potential not just for the Oscar winners Rachel Weisz and Colin Firth, but everyone involved in this marvelous production.

From the StudioCanal UK Production Notes for THE MERCY:

“Short Synopsis

Following his Academy Award® winning film The Theory of Everything, James Marsh directs the incredible true story of Donald Crowhurst (COLIN FIRTH, The King’s Speech, Kingsman: The Secret Service, The Railway Man), an amateur sailor who competed in the 1968 Sunday Times Golden Globe Race in the hope of becoming the first person in history to single-handedly circumnavigate the globe without stopping. With an unfinished boat and his business and house on the line, Donald leaves his wife, Clare (RACHEL WEISZ, The Light Between Oceans, The Lobster) and their children behind, hesitantly embarking on an adventure on his boat the Teignmouth Electron.    Co-starring DAVID THEWLIS (Anomalisa, The Theory of Everything) and KEN STOTT (‘War & Peace’, The Hobbit), and produced by Blueprint Pictures (The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, In Bruges), the story of Crowhurst’s dangerous solo voyage and the struggles he confronted on the epic journey while his family awaited his return is one of the most enduring mysteries of recent times.”

 

Check out our other video about this movie and the Crowhurst story featuring director Simon Rumley:

 

Subscribe to get season 2 in the crossing the Pacific and sail the Marquesas, Fakarava, and Tahiti.

 

We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at

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Mantus Marine was a corporate sponsor of this video.

 

Support us at

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On the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast Linus Wilson has interviewed the crew of Sailing SV Delos, WhiteSpotPirates (Untie the Lines), Chase the Story Sailing, Gone with the Wynns, MJ Sailing, Sailing Doodles, SV Prism, Sailing Miss Lone Star, and many others.

Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:

 

Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

and

How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.

Associate Producer, Anders Colbenson

Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com

music by http://www.BenSound.com

Copyright Linus Wilson, Vermilion Advisory Services, 2018

Chichester

The Secret to Making and Indie Film that Resonates: The Slow Boat Sailing Podcast Episode 45 Guest, Simon Rumley Writes about Making Crowhurst

IMG_9282Donald Crowhurst’s story is truly a unique one, combining British derring-do and proud flag waving adventurousness with an intimate story of a dream gone very badly wrong.

In the late 1960’s when men were landing on the moon, it seemed like nothing was impossible. Sir Francis Chichester had just sailed single-handedly around the world (stopping in Sydney for a well earned quick rest) while Sir Chay Blyth and Sir John Ridgway rowed across the North Atlantic, all modestly brushing off these daring feats as being only marginally more dangerous than going to buy a pint of milk at the local shop. The idea that a man might sail around the world with as little experience as Crowhurst still seems vainglorious and crazy although, in reality, both the aforementioned Blyth and Ridgway also set out on the same Golden Globe race with equally little, if not less, experience. Crowhurst’s story is tragic not only because he (probably) committed suicide but also because he left behind a wife and four children. Yet here was a man who was ultimately neither hero nor anti-hero but in a strange way both because his reasons for entering the race were entirely admirable; he wanted to win the £5000 prize money so he could support his family and extricate himself from financial debt. Forget that he cheated and lied to the whole world, somehow his comeuppance still feels too excessive for what seemed more like a series of white lies rather than deceitful, harmful falsifications. Robin Knox Johnson (winner and only man to finish the race) famously said that history should not judge Crowhurst too harshly and this is something we have taken to heart in the film.

With our modest budget, there was no way we’ll be able to compete with a larger production in grandiosity of scale and have massive Perfect Storm or White Squall type sea-spraying storm scenes. So artistry, imagination and suggestion came to the fore in telling this unique story in a unique way.

The main thing we’ve concentrated on is the emotional and psychological journey that Crowhurst went on; the narrative is about a man on a boat after all, and during this journey there are a few highs and quite a few lows. Not only is his loneliness and isolation explored but also, the ultimate irony that as each of his competitors drops out, so he comes closer to winning – the last thing, it turns out, he ever wanted to happen. There’s something terribly British about cheating to come last yet, perhaps worse, is cheating to come last and actually failing and winning by mistake.

When not concentrating on Crowhurst himself, we cut away to give the film a dynamism and pacing beyond its man-in-a-boat origins. The film is interspersed with descriptions of each of the other sailors, read by a BBC newscaster with maps to illustrate where they dropped out of the race. At the beginning of the story, after two sailors already crash out, Crowhurst humorously notes that he hasn’t even left home and he’s gone from 9th place to 7th. As the race progresses it becomes apparent that if the other contestants continue to drop out, then Crowhurst’s benignly cheating ways will have disastrous consequences for him. So, just by having these inserts, a great drama and tension is imbued into the film as the dawning realisation that disaster looms.
To emphasise the Britishness of the situation and how important honour and the Empire were back in the 1960’s we took inspiration from Paul Thomas Anderson’s Magnolia where the whole cast sing Aimee Man’s ‘Wise Up’. From when Crowhurst departs to his final demise, we have various rousing and traditional British hymns/carols sung by various members of the cast – starting off with ‘Land of Hope and Glory’ when he leaves Teignmouth Harbour to The National Anthem when he realises his mission is in tatters. In between, we also have ‘Jerusalem, I Vow To Thee, My Country’ and ‘Silent Night, Holy Night’. The songs are sung by Crowhurst’s supporters but as his plight progresses they, bit by bit, fall away so that it’s only him singing with his family (him on his boat, them at home in England) and for one of the final scenes singing the National Anthem, it’s just Donald alone, on his trimaran.

Working alongside Nicolas Roeg during development on this project has been a terrific
experience for me. Nic’s legacy to the art of film is enduring. Don’t Look Now, The Man Who Fell To Earth, Walkabout, Bad Timing, Eureka and the ultimate in filmed madness, Performance, all contain huge elements of the outsider, the alienated and the the horror and seduction of loneliness. Nic’s contribution to this film in terms of his support, influence and advice has been huge.
The goal of the film has been to treat Donald as the honourable man that he was before leaving on his voyage; a dreamer, a man with a vision, a father and husband, and more than anything, a British underdog. I hope the audience will empathise with his situation, share his hopes and dreams and ultimately his horror at the crazy turn of events the race unpredictably took. In Justin Salinger (Everest, Heartless, Enduring Love) I cast an immensely powerful and captivating actor who completely projected Donald’s charm – perfectly capturing his affable optimism yet never letting go of that sense of being a dreamer with a tangible vulnerability.

I’m very proud of this small but intense movie. It’s an incredible film about an incredible journey by an incredible man.

by Simon Rumley

Simon has been described by Screen International as ‘One of the great British cinematic outsiders’. His career started at the end of the 1990’s when he made a triptych of youth culture films set in London – STRONG LANGUAGE and THE TRUTH GAME were both released by the BFI and premiered at the National Film Theatre whilst CLUB LE MONDE was released more widely. They were critically praised and STRONG LANGUAGE garnered two BIFA nominations including one for Best Newcomer. After that, his films went into a darker, more psychological territory and gained him a strong following on the worldwide genre circuit. Both THE LIVING AND THE DEAD and RED WHITE & BLUE premiered in Rotterdam and the latter also played at SXSW. Together the films won over 50 awards around the world including best films at all the major genre festivals such as Sitges, Fantasia and FantasticFest. After these, he directed parts of two successful horror anthologies, LITTLE DEATHS and ABCs OF DEATH, the latter of which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival. Most recently he has finished filming a true story in Louisiana, THE LAST WORD, produced by veteran Hollywood director Frank Mancuso Jr (Species, Ronin, etc). He has recently directed FASHIONISTA and ONCE UPON A TIME IN LONDON. Simon’s films have played all around the world and been distributed likewise. Empire Magazine described him as ‘One of the most important and intelligent British film-makers working today.’

You can hear Simon Rumley on episode 45 of the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast. The critically aclaimed Crowhurst film is currently running in the UK.

The director’s notes and bios were taken from the Studio Canal UK Crowhurst Production notes. The picture above features Justin Salinger as Donald Crowhurst.

Sailboat LOAN SECRETS | Financing the Cruising Boat with Gary Fretz, Catamaran Yacht Broker

Yacht broker Gary Fretz outlines the big sailboat loan process. We break down the costs and qualifications for a $250,000 sailing yacht.

He says you should only deal with marine lenders and lists the ones that write loans on non-US documented vessels and vessels outside the USA. You need a 680+ FICO credit score, at least 20% down, and less than a 35% debt-to-income ratio. Gary Fretz mostly helps buyers looking for big sailing catamarans that are 5 years or less old. For a $250,000 boat you can expect a $900-$1000 monthly payment based on 20% down and fixed interest rates of 3.75 and 5.0 percent. The number of lenders and terms of boat loans for smaller and older boats are generally worse. He also talks about some of the tax and registration issues with foreign boats. He argues Caribbean sailing catamarans are typically 10-15% less expensive than US-based boats. It costs about $2.50 per mile to have a boat delivered.

We break out the secrets to getting the best sailing catamaran for a great price and maximizing your resale value. Many top vloggers such as Sailing La Vagabonde and Sailing Zatara are selling their monohulls to buy a catamar Gary Fretz has been a yacht broker for 30 years. He helped Jessica and Ryan Adventures buy their sailing catamaran and he can help you too. Once you live aboard space becomes so important and cats have more space! Seasonal and Regional Factors are crucial in price you pay for a cat. Gary Fretz gives a way all his secrets if you e-mail him at

BigYachts {at} gmail [dot] com

Gary Fretz is the
Yachts International, Founder and CEO
Licensed and Bonded Yacht and Ship Broker (since 1989)
Member: International Yacht Brokers Association
LargeCatamaransForSale.com

Castle Harbor Boating School, Inc. (Owner)
America’s Oldest Sailing School (since 1949)
Yacht Charters/Boating School/Club/Rentals
CastleHarbor.com and Castle Harbor Boating School.com

Essex offers a daily snapshot of the boat loans. They are not a sponsor and terms and conditions to all loans apply.

This is not investment advice or an offer for credit. We sail here at Slow Boat Sailing and don’t offer credit.

https://www.essexcredit.com/home/boat/rates/

Subscribe to get season 2 in the crossing the Pacific and sail the Marquesas, Fakarava, and Tahiti.

Linus Wilson is the host of the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast that has interviewed White Spot Pirates, Sailing Doodles, and Sailing SV Delos among many others.

We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at
http://www.mantusanchors.com/?affiliates=15
Mantus Anchors and SailTimer Wind Instrument (TM) are corporate sponsors of this video.
Support us at
http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing
Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

and
How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producer, Anders Colbenson
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
music by http://www.BenSound.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Vermilion Advisory Services, 2018loanyellow1280by720

Cruising Outpost Runs “Tracking the Strange Voyage of the SV Sea Nymph”

P152

You can read the rest of the article online at issuu for a small fee which gives you the whole Spring 2018 issue. Alternatively, you can buy the print version at places like West Marine or Barnes & Nobel if you are not already a subscriber.

It seems that the editors at Cruising Outpost edited down the length around page 154. I was never given a proof or edited version of the article prior to publication. The Cruising Outpost editors wrote something I definitely would not have approved if had I got the chance. They wrote, “Such a slow speed seems only consistent to see if they had stopped anyplace before being rescued.” That phrase is a bit awkward and, giving the editors the benefit of the doubt, perhaps they meant that “the slow speeds make reasonable to ask if they stopped somewhere before being rescued.”

What I wrote was very different. This is what I submitted to Cruising Outpost in that part of the article:

Such a slow speed seems only consistent with a craft completely adrift. Nevertheless, Ms. Appel disputed that her boat was not adrift in her GoFundMe appeal from November 25, 2017, “We were not ‘adrift’. ‘Adrift’ denotes that we had no ability to steer, which fails to account for our ability to circle Christmas Island, leave the Dragon’s Triangle, almost return to Hawaii or navigate over 2,000 miles from our failed attempt to return to Hawaii to reach 7.4km Wake Island.”

            To the author, these slow reported speeds of less than one knot raise the possibility that the Sea Nymph stopped somewhere between May 18, 2017, and October 1, 2017, (Honolulu time). Those were two points that the author has confirmed in which the Sea Nymph hailed the Christmas Island and USAF respectively. The maximum hull speed of the Sea Nymph based on the 32.5-foot waterline length reported in sailboatdata.com for the Starrett and Jenks 45 is 7.6 knots. That indicates that the Sea Nymph could reach Wake Island from Tahiti, about 2,400 nautical miles, in less than two weeks. Thus, if the reports of the USCG hailing the Sea Nymph near Tahiti on June 15, 2017, are true, then the crew would have had plenty of time to anchor and go ashore several at different ports prior to reaching Wake Island on October 2, 2017, local time.

            The Sea Nymph‘s reported speed picked up to 1.7 knots between the confirmed locations of Wake Island and the crew’s eventual rescue 900 miles southeast of Japan, points 19 and 20.

            Jennifer Appel told the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast in the bonus interview to episode 42 that she had never looked at the GPS tracks on the Garmin GPSMAP 76cx which she had on board and salvaged from the abandoned boat. She told Matt Lauer on the Today Show, before Mr. Lauer was fired, that her tracks proved she wasn’t near Tahiti on June 15, 2017. Sailing Anarchy writer Alan Block said in his podcast episode 27 that he had Ms. Appel’s Garmin GPSMAP. He told listeners that could not find any tracks, at least initially, on the Garmin GPSMAP 76cx micro SD card.

              Here are some possible ways the mystery about the strange voyage of the Sea Nymph may be resolved. If the Sea Nymph is ever found, it may corroborate or dispute the account of Ms. Appel. Donald Crowhurst’s abandoned yacht contained logs that he had landed in Argentina secretly in the middle of the first solo, nonstop circumnavigation race, the Sunday Time’s Golden Globe Race, in 1968. A government body could use subpoena power to look at phone or credit card records that may corroborate or dispute Ms. Appel’s account of her voyage. The US Navy, in correspondence with the author, said that it did not even bother to check the ladies’ passports to see if they had stopped anyplace before being rescued.

The point that I made on above quote from the deleted part of my submission to Cruising Outpost, which I read on my podcast, and wrote in an earlier blog is that Ms. Appel is saying two things that oppose each other. At this point, there is no way, in my mind, to decide which one of the two possibilities is true:

  1. Ms. Appel gave up on sailing around June and mostly drifted downwind for months, or
  2. Ms. Appel and Ms. Fuiava stopped somewhere between May 3, 2017, and October 25, 2017, and are lying about not stopping anywhere.

I don’t think there is enough information to determine if 1 or 2 is true, but Ms. Appel says both 1 and 2 are false. I have repeatedly asked Ms. Appel to record an interview about the June to October segment of her trip, but she has declined those interview requests. Since the magazine is already on shelves, there is no way to correct that awkward phrase that I never wrote and do not agree with.

Oh well! Let’s just sail on.

by Linus Wilson

4 Sailors in the Everglades Challenge Race Were Rescued (Video), 1 Paddler Died UPDATED

The tally of the Watertribe Everglades Challenge participants rescued on Saturday, March 3, 2018, keeps rising. Another man, Thad Rice, who was paddling, died early in the race. The latest two were rescued by the Sarasota County Sheriff’s office using a boat and helicopter. Slow Boat Sailing previously identified two additional sailors who were rescued by 29-foot US Coast Guard boats. Wiley Parker and Weston Wilkins were rescued from the two-man sailboat by the Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office. You can see the video of the sailors’ rescue below:

Here is the press release from the Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office:

Sarasota County Sheriff Tom Knight is reminding residents and visitors to consider safe boating practices, following a weekend boating competition that led to a marine rescue.

Deputies were first alerted to a vessel and two boaters in distress Saturday afternoon around 4:45 p.m., when the U.S. Coast Guard received word of an activated PLB or “personal locator beacon” in the gulf. Air-1 immediately responded and located the capsized vessel and two sailors approximately two miles offshore near Turtle Beach. Marine deputies threw safety lines and pulled both men on board who were provided thermal blankets and later medically cleared by paramedics.

Sheriff Knight is using this opportunity to remind boaters that despite the seemingly warm weather, even brief exposure to gulf temperatures are low enough to produce hypothermia. Residents and visitors are encouraged to always bring safety equipment on board including life jackets and GPS-enabled beacons that can help first responders locate you if you are in distress. Finally, always complete a float plan before you leave so family or friends know where you will be and when you are expected to return.

“We are undoubtedly relieved these boaters survived gulf temperatures and made it to safety thanks to Air-1 and our Marine Unit,” said Sheriff Knight. “While safety is our top priority, so is education and it is critical when organizations create these competitions that they do their homework beforehand. Participants should be equipped with the tools they need to safely compete, weather conditions should be reviewed, and most importantly, organizations must communicate their plans to public safety agencies in advance.”

With four rescues on Saturday, it seems like the Sheriff thinks Watertribe has some explaining to do…

Here are some USCG photos of the other two rescues:

 

 

 

The Watertribe website warns participants in the waiver in red letters,”If you are not an expert paddler and/or sailor, do not enter this race. Even if you are a well prepared expert you may DIE – yes, you may DIE.”

That seems to have happened this time around. Steve Isaac, the founder of the race wrote on its forums, “I am sad to report the passing of BlueJay (aka Thad Rice).” Mr. Rice was padding an expedition kayak or canoe, according to the race results.  Also on that forum, Paula Martel wrote, “We learned today that Thaddeus died from a heart attack. Knowing that he had set up three methods of getting back into his boat, she [Mr. Rice’s wife] believes he was unconscious.”

There were two USCG rescues from a small boat race on March 3, 2018. #watertribe #evergladeschallenge

The US Coast Guard rescued an Olympic silver medalist in sailing near Sanibel Island, Florida and another man near Casey Key, Florida on the evening of March 3, 2018. Slow Boat Sailing identified both men as participants in the first day of the Watertribe Everglades Challenge race for small boats, which includes kayaks, canoes, and sailboats. Both men, Randy Smyth and Paul Friedman, were in sailboats. Randy Smith, 63, the former Olympian, saw his 20-foot trimaran capsize, 12 miles south of Sanibel Island, Florida before a 29-foot US Coast Guard boat rescued him. The Watertribe Everglades Challenge goes from Tampa Bay to Key Largo, Florida.

USCG photos: On the top left is 14-foot sailboat owned by Paul Friedman. The top right and bottom is the rescue photos of Randy Smyth.

Paul Friedman was not immediately identified as a racer because he was listed as “anonymous” with only his Watertribe name of “RumLime.” Slow Boat Sailing matched the WaterTribe nickname to his “Rougues Gallery” on the WaterTribe site, which identified him as Cork Friedman. Given the time of his rescue, it seems likely that “Cork” or “RumLime”, who was the only monohull sailboat to drop out of the race after the start and its first checkpoint, which was some miles south of the rescue, is Paul Friedman. Paul Friedman was dismasted two miles west of Casey Key in his 14-foot sailboat. The USCG’s 29-foot boat towed Mr. Friedman’s sailboat into Venice Inlet’s Crow’s Nest Marina.

Check out Slow Boat Sailing’s vlog about Venice Inlet below:

The author wrote about his stay in the Crow’s Nest Marina in the book Slow Boat to the Bahamas.

by Linus Wilson

Force 12 Storm Sinks Sailboats at Holyhead Marina when Emma Meets the Beast of the East

The force 12 Storm Emma sunk about 80 boats at Holyhead Marina in Northern Wales. Emma was an extreme winter storm packing hurricane force winds and waves in the Irish Sea when it combined with Siberian air known as “the Beast of the East.”

Holyhead Sailing Club member Sue Williams took amazing footage of sunk and beached sailboats. The docks and pontoons in the 400 plus boat marina were destroyed in the wee hours of the morning on March 2, 2018. While the east coast of the US faced the Bomb Cyclone, the UK suffered 10s of billions of pounds in insurance losses from the winter storm Emma that created blizzard conditions in much of Great Britain. Sailors, sailboat owners, yachtsmen, and boating enthusiasts do not only have to worry about hurricanes in the summer, but also they must protect themselves against winter cyclones like the bomb cyclone and Storm Emma. The boats that did the best were hauled out of the water before the Storm Emma hit.

Subscribe to get season 2 in the crossing the Pacific and sail the Marquesas, Fakarava, and Tahiti.

On the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast we interview the most interesting cruising sailors in the world such as the creators of Sailing SV Delos, Sailing Doodles, and White Spot Pirates, and Wicked Salty. We interviewed Nikki Walsh, Tanner Broadwell, and Dee Caffari, too.

We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at

http://www.mantusanchors.com/?affiliates=15

Mantus Anchors is the corporate sponsor of this video.

Support us at

http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

and

How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.

Associate Producer, Anders Colbenson

Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com

music by http://www.BenSound.com

Copyright Linus Wilson, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

Thumb

UNPREPARED TO GO TO SEA | Jungle of MOLD BUGS & MUD | ATUONA – HIVA OA S2E8 Slow Boat Sailing

Linus finds a jungle of mold on the Slow Boat when he returns after 5 months. He goes to sea unprepared to avoid the bugs, mud, and torrential rains in Hiva Oa in the Marquesas. His sailboat lacks a sail and several things are not tied down as he flees the crowded anchorage of Tahauku Bay near Atuona. Linus has to transport the only potable water one liter at a time in a mad rush to flee the waterlogged French Polynesian island. He also replaces another battery because it became waterlogged. Linus and Daly (the dog) sail to Tahuata’s paradise of clear blue water and white sand beaches, Hanamoenoa Bay.

Subscribe to get season 2 in the crossing the Pacific and sail the Marquesas, Fakarava, and Tahiti.

We use a Mantus Anchor and swivel on our boat. Get all your Mantus gear at
http://www.mantusanchors.com/?affiliates=15
Mantus Anchors and SailTimer Wind Instrument (TM) are corporate sponsors of this video.
Support us at
http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing
Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

and
How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producer, Anders Colbenson
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
music by http://www.BenSound.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018eew1280by720