Susie Goodall Aboard Ship, Rescued from Dismasted Sailboat

British sailor Susie Goodall made it aboard her rescue ship as of 15:14 UTC on Friday, December 7, 2018, according to her race team. The rescue ship is the Tian Fu, a 190-meter long ship.  Goodall was hoisted by a crane aboard the large cargo ship from her yacht. The injured sailor abandoned her dismasted 36-foot sailboat DHL Starlight. On December 5, 2018, the yacht was pitchpoled in a Southern Ocean storm 2,000 nautical miles west northwest of Cape Horn. This was the fourth sailor out of eighteen starters to be rescued since the event began 159 days earlier on July 1, 2018. This latest one was for the lone woman and youngest participant in the solo-nonstop, around the world race.

Goodall was the last native English speaker in the race. The original 1968 race was won by its only finisher England’s Sir Robin Knox-Johnston. The Golden Globe Race (GGR) is a retro, solo, non-stop race around the world for small sailboats. Only five of the original eighteen participants are still planning to complete the 30,000 nautical mile race. Two boats have rounded Cape Horn and are sailing up the Atlantic to the finish in Les Sables-d’Olonne, France. Three others are over 1,000 miles from Cape Horn in the Pacific. Susie Goodall’s yacht is the fifth to be dismasted in the Southern Ocean.

Rescued

Goodall has been suffering from a concussion and bruises from her DHL Starlight’s pitchpoling prior to its dismasting in a Southern Ocean storm. Since that accident 2,000 nautical miles west northwest of Cape Horn in the Pacific Ocean she has struggled to keep down water and has not eaten. She has vomited many times since the dismasting. She was healthy enough to cut away the mast over the last two days. Rigging in the water has been known to sink vessels if not cut away.

MV Tian Fu is bound for Madryn, Argentina. That will give Goodall the opportunity to round Cape Horn albeit not on her yacht. According to MarineTraffic.com it is due into port on December 17, 2018, but it may have been delayed up to four days by the rescue.

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Analysis: Susie Goodall’s Rescue Today Will be the Riskiest of the GGR

UPDATE: The Golden Globe Race confirms that as of UTC 15:14, December 7, 2018, that Susie Goodall is on the MV Tian Fu.

More details here!

British sailor Susie Goodall sighted her rescue ship at about 12:00 UTC on Friday, December 7, 2018. The injured sailor is trying to get off her dismasted 36-foot sailboat DHL Starlight. Big challenges remain for the injured sailor to get aboard the massive ship in what will likely be the riskiest rescue by a Golden Globe Race sailor yet. Yes, the 159-day-old race has had three previous rescues. This latest one for the lone woman and youngest participant in the solo-nonstop, around the world race has the least chance of success going into its final hours.

The Golden Globe Race (GGR) is a retro, solo, non-stop race around the world for small sailboats. Only five of the original eighteen participants are still planning to complete the 30,000 nautical mile race. Two boats have rounded Cape Horn and are sailing up the Atlantic to the finish in Les Sables-d’Olonne, France. Three others are over 1,000 miles from Cape Horn in the Pacific. Susie Goodall’s yacht is the fifth to be dismasted in the Southern Ocean.

The rescue ship is the Tian Fu, a 190-meter long ship. The ship’s master has confirmed to the GGR that no man over board boat is available. (They have a RIB, but don’t want to attempt it in these conditions of 4-meter waves.) The current plan is for the Chinese ship’s crew to use the crane to lift Goodall from the high sided ship. Susie will have to find a way to get to the ship. Unfortunately, her engine started and died in the big seas. Small sailboat engines usually suffer from fuel system problems in big seas in my experience. Moreover, they lack the power to move against the wind and seas in anything over force 5 conditions. Thus, the massive cargo ship is the more maneuverable craft at the moment.

Ship rescues are often dramatic and frequently go badly. The size and poor maneuverability of giant ships mean that the stricken yachts are sunk while trying to save their crew. Rescued sailors can be bruised from the ships sides or be thrown into the water. 4-meter waves are forecasted for this rescue. That makes getting close to the ship much more dangerous.  No prior GGR rescue was directly from such a large ship.

The other three rescues went smoothly, but none were from a high sided ship. The sea state for the other three rescues were in much smaller waves. The other rescues used smaller boats, RIBs or rigid inflatable boats, to transport the sailors onto the rescue ship. In addition, aerial support helped the prior rescue ship teams hone in on the four other dismasted Golden Globe Race sailors. No air support has been provided in this case.

RiskyRescue

Goodall has been suffering from a concussion and bruises from her DHL Starlight’s pitchpoling prior to its dismasting in a Southern Ocean storm. Since that accident 2,000 nautical miles west northwest of Cape Horn in the Pacific Ocean she has struggled to keep down water and has not eaten. She has vomited many times since the dismasting. She was healthy enough to cut away the mast over the last two days. Rigging in the water has been known to sink vessels if not cut away.

The current plan is to use the ships crane with a line. Goodall’s job would be to grasp the whipping line in 4-meter seas and clip in. Then she would be hoisted by one of the ship’s huge cranes. She has her life jacket with harness and a climbing harness to clip into the line. She also plans to have two ditch bags tied to a separate line. The line attached to the crane itself is a hazard. If all goes well Goodall will be on a pendulum. A worse outcome would be that she would be knocked off the line or swing into the steel ship. Sailors have died before attempting to be rescued by massive ships.

While the Indian and Australian Navies were eager to help in prior rescues in the Indian Ocean, the British sailor Susie Goodall, who is arguably the most popular of the racers, has not got the slightest attention from any Navy, including the United Kingdom. She has relied on the Chilean rescue coordinators and the duty of massive commercial ships. That lack of interest by the navies of the world may reduce her chances of success.

Another problem is that this rescue attempt could sink Goodall’s yacht preventing more suitable rescue craft such as Hungarian born American sailor Istavan Kopar’s 35-foot yacht from rescuing Goodall. There are no easy answers. Goodall’s charging capacity is gone, and her satellite phones and rescue devices are losing their batteries. Kopar’s sailboat Puffin is still days away. By that time, it may be much harder to track Goodall.

Goodall’s inability to hold down food or liquids could be life threatening if she waits for another boat. Death from dehydration can happen in as little as three days. Moreover, it is uncertain how much water she still has onboard after the pitchpoling which destroyed her emergency water stores.

Dr. Linus Wilson is the creator of the Slow Boat Sailing YouTube Channel and Podcast which have covered many sailing disasters and rescues. He holds a USCG, “six-pack” captain’s license, OUPV-Near Coastal. He has written three books about sailing including How to Sail Around the World Part-Time. He can be reached at linuswilson [at] outlook <dot> com.

Sailing in the Dangerous Archipelago at Night S2E17

Anna, Linus, and Daly sail through the Dangerous Archipelago at night at the end of a four-day offshore passage from Ua Pou, Marquesas to Fakarava, Tuamotos in French Polynesia. They are racing against the calendar and an incoming frontal system. Tricky tidal currents complicate their entrance to the remote atoll of Fakarava.

Dangerous
Support the videos at
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On the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast Linus Wilson has interviewed the crew of Sailing SV Delos, WhiteSpotPirates (Untie the Lines), Chase the Story Sailing, Gone with the Wynns, MJ Sailing, Sailing Doodles, SV Prism, Sailing Miss Lone Star, and many others.

Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:
Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook
and How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing
have been #1 sailing ebook bestsellers on Amazon.

Linus Wilson reads the first four chapters of Sailing to Treasure Island by Captain John C. Voss. You can get the full audiobook at

http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

SAILING TO TREASURE ISLAND: The Cruise of the XORA (Annotated) by Captain J.C. Voss
The paperback at
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1790302390
or
http://www.lulu.com/shop/captain-jc-voss/sailing-to-treasure-island-the-cruise-of-the-xora/paperback/product-23887731.html

or the eBook at
http://www.lulu.com/shop/captain-jc-voss/sailing-to-treasure-island-the-cruise-of-the-xora/ebook/product-23887490.html

Learn the Navigation Rules for the Captain’s Exam with this audio album:
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Associate Producers Anders Colbenson, Larry Wilson, Ted Royer, and Rick Moore (SSL).
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Copyright Linus Wilson, Oxriver Publishing, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

British Yachtswoman Susie Goodall Awaits Friday Morning Rescue

British yachtswoman Susie Goodall remains safe and secure aboard her yacht DHL Starlight after being pitchpoled and dismasted in the Southern Ocean some 2,000 miles west of Cape Horn yesterday. Overnight, Chilean rescue authorities have tasked another ship, the 38,000 ton Hong Kong registered bulk carrier MV Tian Fu bound from China to Modran, Argentina, to go to her aid and it is due to reach her position at 05:00 UTC Friday.

Conditions have moderated overnight but seas remain challenging, making life onboard very uncomfortable.

Susie remains in regular contact with Race HQ and will spend today preparing for evacuation tomorrow. The flooding is now under control, and today she will endeavour to coax DHL Starlight’s engine to run again in case she is required to manoeuvre her yacht alongside the ship.  She will also ensure that the yacht’s liferaft is ready to deploy.

It will still be dark when the MV Tian Fu reaches the scene and the rescue operation is unlikely to commence before daylight.  It will be for her Captain to decide the best method to transfer Goodall from yacht to ship. This could entail launching the ship’s own man-overboard vessel, or lowering a cargo net or ladder over the side for her to climb up from the yacht or her liferaft.

FridayAMRescue

Timeline of text messages received from Susie Goodall before and after being dismasted:

05 Dec 08:29 UTC: TAKING A HAMMERING! WONDERING WHAT ON EARTH I’M DOING OUT HERE Position: 45′ 33.054 S 122′ 37.061 W

05 Dec 12:33 UTC; DISMASTED.HULL OK. NO FORM OF JURY RIG, TOTAL LOSS Position: 45′ 27.787 S 122′ 23.537 W

05 Dec 12:57 UTC: INTERIOR TOTAL WRECK, LIFERAFT OK, Position: 45′ 27.284 S 122′ 22.985

05 Dec 13:23 UTC: NASTY HEAD BANG AS BOAT PITCHPOLED. UNBELIEVABLY ROLY NOW Position: 45′ 26.735 S 122′ 22.490 W

05 Dec 13:24 UTC: TOTALLY & UTTERLY GUTTED! Position: 45′ 26.702 S 122′ 22.460 W

05 Dec 23:04 UTC: THIS MOTION IS JUST HORRIBLE! CLINGING ON IN MY BUNK. Position: 45′ 25.629 S 122′ 13.763 W

06 Dec 02:51 UTC: IN NEED OF A GOOD CUPPA TEA! BUT SADLY NO COOKER Position: 45′ 24.506 S 122′ 05.482 W

The above was a press release from the 2018 Golden Globe Race dated 9:00 AM UTC on Thursday, December 6, 2018.

Susie Goodall’s EPIRB Activated, Adrift Sailboat Pitchpoled & Dismasted in the GGR 2018

Susie Goodall’s sailboat was pitchpoled and dismasted in the 2018 Golden Globe Race. She was 2,000nm northwest of Cape Horn.

The English solo sailor activated her EPIRB distress beacon at UTC 11AM on December 5, 2018.She was in fourth place of the 2018 GGR sailing race for 32-to-36-foot sailboats. She is the fifth racer to see her boat dismasted and the fourth to signal for rescue. Other dismasted Golden Globe Race sailing captains were Abhilash Tomy, Gregor McGuckin, Are Wiig, and Loic Lepage. The Golden Globe Race had 18 competitors leave Les Sables d’Olonne, France on July 1, 2018. After Susie’s dismasting only 5 racers plan to continue in the solo, non-stop race for 32-to-36-foot sailboats. Goodall’s DHL Starlight is a Rustler 36 and is taking on water through deck leaks opened up from the pitchpole. A ship the 38,000 ton 190 meter Chinese container ship is en route. Goodall suffered a head injury and was knocked out immediately after the accident. The battery system is believed to be damaged and she will soon lose electrical capabilities. The rig is totally destroyed.

The GGR press release said:
“British yachtswoman Susie Goodall was pitchpoled and dismasted in the Southern Ocean some 2,000 miles west of Cape Horn today. A distress signal was first picked up from her yacht by Falmouth Coastguard at 11:00 UTC, who then alerted Race Control and the Chilean Maritime Search and Rescue authorities responsible for this sector of the South Pacific.
Goodall, (29) from Falmouth UK, and the youngest competitor in the Golden Globe Race, was lying in 4th place at the time, riding out a ferocious storm with 60 knot winds and massive seas aboard her Rustler 36 yacht DHL Starlight.”

Flippedyellow

Support the videos at
http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing
On the Slow Boat Sailing Podcast Linus Wilson has interviewed the crew of Sailing SV Delos, WhiteSpotPirates (Untie the Lines), Chase the Story Sailing, Gone with the Wynns, MJ Sailing, Sailing Doodles, SV Prism, Sailing Miss Lone Star, and many others.

Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:
Slow Boat to the Bahamas

Slow Boat to Cuba

https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook
and How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing
have been #1 sailing ebook bestsellers on Amazon.

inus Wilson reads the first four chapters of Sailing to Treasure Island by Captain John C. Voss. You can get the full audiobook at

http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

SAILING TO TREASURE ISLAND: The Cruise of the XORA (Annotated) by Captain J.C. Voss
The paperback at
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1790302390
or
http://www.lulu.com/shop/captain-jc-voss/sailing-to-treasure-island-the-cruise-of-the-xora/paperback/product-23887731.html

or the eBook at
http://www.lulu.com/shop/captain-jc-voss/sailing-to-treasure-island-the-cruise-of-the-xora/ebook/product-23887490.html

Associate Producers Anders Colbenson, Larry Wilson, Ted Royer, and Rick Moore (SSL).
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Oxriver Publishing, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

Pirate SOS by Sailboat in Pacific Puddle Jump

 

71-year old Richard Carr wrote to his family that pirates were attacking him and their 36-foot sailboat. He was sailing 2,800 miles to the Marquesas and was over 1,100 miles from the nearest land 26-days into his solo trip from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and Hiva Oa, Marquesas on May 27, 2017. He was last heard of on May 28, 2017, when his Garmin, Delorme, InReach satellite texting device stopped working. He warned his family that he was being “kidnapped” by pirates. In this video, we explore this story of being lost at sea with Ali Carr Troxell. Ali Troxell analyzes the disturbing texts, the coast guard rescue efforts, Mr. Carr’s gear, background and experience. Captain Linus Wilson, OUPV-Near Coastal interviews Mr. Carr’s daughter and gives his take on the mystery as a sailor who has done the Marquesas passage. There are many lessons for potential offshore sailors in this video. It is a must watch.
Richard Carr was a lifelong sailor, but only recently bought his 1985, 36-foot Union Cutter sailboat, six years before departing. For much of his life he did not own a sailboat. He sold his prior yacht the Cortez when he had kids. With grandchildren and nearing retirement, he dreamed of sailing around the world. He sailed with a crew member in the Baja Ha-Ha before departing on his 2,800 solo trip.

You can see Ali Carr Troxell’s brave and well researched story at Outside Magazine:

November 12, 2018, “My Father’s SOS—From the Middle of the Sea”
https://www.outsideonline.com/2360811/mayday-fathers-disappearance-pirates

Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:
Slow Boat to the Bahamas

PirateSOSThumb16by9

Slow Boat to Cuba

https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook
and How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing
have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producers Anders Colbenson, Larry Wilson, Ted Royer, and Rick Moore (SSL).
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Oxriver Publishing, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

Shipwreck on Cocos Island by Captain Voss

Mac and I took the dinghy and pulled round to Wafer Bay, where the goods we had come for were supposed to be stored. After rounding a sharp, rocky promontory, Wafer Bay opened up, and a small house came in sight on the upper end of the right side of the bay. We made for it and landed a few yards from the building. Out of the house stepped a man of rather slim build. I should say that he was certainly six-feet-four inches in height. He had a beard hanging down from his chin which was about two feet long. The gentleman was followed by a small, pleasant looking lady.

Map1

On reaching us, the gentleman introduced himself as Mr. Giesler, Governor of Cocos Island, and the lady as his wife.

“Pleased to meet you, Mr. and Mrs. Giesler,” I said. This was not quite ninety-nine per cent true because I had nourished the hope that we should have the island to ourselves.

“Where do you come from?” asked the Governor.

“Victoria, B.C.,” I replied. “We made Chatham Bay this morning at daybreak, got becalmed, dropped anchor, and rowed round here in our dinghy.”

“You are after the treasure of course?” said Giesler.

“No, not that exactly,” I said. “We are just on a little pleasure cruise and thought we would come and have a look at the island.” (That was another lie).

“Of course, Mr. Giesler,” Mac said, “if you’ve got any gold bricks you don’t want, we don’t mind taking them along.”

Mrs. Giesler smiled at that and said gold bricks were very scarce on Cocos Island.

“Are they?” I said. “I thought you had lots of them.”

“Yes,” replied the Governor, “there are lots of them here, but we have got to find them first.”

Owing to Mr. Giesler’s size and appearance, I considered it advisable to keep on the right side of him. I therefore said, “Mr. Giesler, we have got a few days to spare. Will you allow us to prospect for the treasure, and if we find it, will you allow us to take it on board our vessel?”

“You can prospect as much as you like,” replied Mr. Giesler, “but of whatever you find you must give the Costa Rica Government one-third.”

I could see no way of avoiding this gift of one-third to the Costa Rican Government, so agreed to the Governor’s offer.

When everything was settled Mr. Giesler said, “Now you had better go and bring your vessel round here, and, by the way, how big is she?”

“Ten tons,” I said.

“Ten tons, well, well, well! And you came all the way from Victoria in a ten-ton vessel! Why, a ten-ton vessel will not hold even a fifth part of the gold that is buried here!”

We assured Mr. Giesler that we would probably be satisfied with ten tons of gold and a ton of diamonds. We would let him or the Costa Rican Government keep the rest. He seemed to be well satisfied and asked us to come into his house and have a drink. I have never been known to refuse a good thing. We followed Mr. and Mrs. Giesler into the house. In little more than ten minutes, Mrs. Giesler had a table set for us fit for a king. There was fine homemade bread and butter, ham, eggs, cold roast wild boar, and other things. This was in addition to the good breakfast that we had had before leaving the vessel. We put that on top of it and just about cleared up the table. When Mrs. Giesler saw all the empty dishes on the table, she asked me if we had plenty of provisions on board. Of course, I knew what she was alluding to.

Now let me give the landlubber just a little advice. Never offer a yachtsman anything to eat when he comes on shore, unless you mean it. A yachtsman when cruising is always hungry and doesn’t know how to say “no” when anything in the shape of eatables comes his way.

“What is the draught of your vessel.” asked Mr. Giesler.

“It’s just about four feet,” I replied.

“Is that all? Well, then, you can bring your vessel right up here to my house and tie her up to the trees.”

He then took me outside to show me where to put the vessel. Right at the head of Wafer Bay is a sand spit, which is about three hundred yards deep, between the higher land and deep water. It is about half a mile wide. On both sides, there is high land. At high tide, the sand spit is about three feet under water. On the right side, when coming into the bay and within a few yards of Giesler’s house, there is a stream coming down from the mountains. Just alongside, it is large and deep enough for the Xora to lay comfortably. The stream had washed a hollow through the sand spit, which the Governor claimed sufficiently large to allow our boat to pass through. I, of course, took his word for it, especially as the man said he had been on the island for eighteen years. He knew all the ins and outs of the place. The only thing that he did not know, he said, was where the gold was hidden.

“We will find that easy enough,” Mac said.

It was then about ten o’clock. As Mr. Giesler said it would be high water at noon, Mac and I went back in our dinghy to bring the Xora around. That would allow us to cross the spit at high tide. A nice little breeze had sprung up from the west, and, with a small sail set in our dinghy, we were soon alongside the sloop. Jack, in the meantime, had been fishing. He was busy frying some of his catch, grumbling all the while that the fish refused to bite.

“And how did you catch these fish if they didn’t bite?” asked Mac.

“I went down and hooked them on,” was Jack’s reply.

“Come along here, now, and get up the anchor and set sail and have your growl afterwards,” I said. As my two shipmates were always right on hand when I said the word, we had our anchor up and sail set in no time. With the centreboard down, we beat up against the westerly breeze to Wafer Bay.

On rounding the rocky point, we saw Giesler hoisting the Costa Rican flag, which he had informed us would be a sign that the water was high enough for the Xora to cross the sand spit. I at once directed my course for the channel, and everything went fine until we got about half way across the spit. Then, she struck a rock, and, in less time than I can write it down, the sloop filled with water. We did not even have time to save our provisions much of which was spoiled by the sea water. The sails were lowered at once. We tried hard to get the vessel off but were unable to move her.

I felt like shooting the Governor, and I think we would have shot him if it had not been for his wife. All three of us had murder in our hearts.

ABOVE WAS A SELECTION FROM SAILING TO TREASURE ISLAND: THE CRUISE OF THE XORA BY CAPTAIN J.C. VOSS EDITED AND ANNOTATED BY LINUS WILSON. YOU CAN BUY THE EBOOKPAPERBACK, OR AUDIOBOOK. THEY ALL MAKE GREAT GIFTS FOR YOUR FAVORITE SAILOR.

 

 

Sailing for Pirate GOLD | Cap’n Voss’ Treasure Island

Legendary sailor Captain J. C. Voss meets a man in his hotel in Victoria, British Columbia in 1897. The mystery man tells a tale of pirate treasure and Voss must get a sailboat to find the gold.

The mystery man says he knows where tons of gold and jewels are buried on the remote Cocos Island. Voss takes a 35-foot sailing sloop seven thousand miles through gales in search of the pirate Treasure of Lima worth seven thousand pounds sterling in 1897 or over $200 million today.

GoldThumb

Linus Wilson reads the first four chapters of Sailing to Treasure Island by Captain John C. Voss. You can get the full audiobook at

http://www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

The paperback at

http://www.lulu.com/shop/captain-jc-voss/sailing-to-treasure-island-the-cruise-of-the-xora/paperback/product-23887731.html

or the eBook at

http://www.lulu.com/shop/captain-jc-voss/sailing-to-treasure-island-the-cruise-of-the-xora/ebook/product-23887490.html

Legendary sailor Captain J. C. Voss meets a mysterious man in his hotel in Victoria, British Columbia in 1897. The mystery man says he knows where tons of gold and jewels are buried on the remote Cocos Island. Voss takes a 35-foot sailing sloop seven thousand miles through gales in search of the pirate Treasure of Lima worth seven thousand pounds sterling in 1897 or over $200 million today.

*This is an edited, abridged, and annotated version of the first section of the Venturesome Voyages of Captain Voss concerning the voyage of the XORA sloop. This is the only part of that work focused on treasure hunting.
*In the 2018 edition, the text is extensively edited as the first edition from 1913 had many run-on sentences and poor subject and verb agreement.
*A biography of the great mariner Captain J.C. Voss is written by the editor.
*Frequent footnotes and an editor’s note put the text in historic context.
*This is an abridged version of the VENTURESOME VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN VOSS. This abridged version focuses exclusively on the cruise of the sailboat XORA and treasure hunting aboard it. Most of the VENTURESOME VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN VOSS is about the voyage of the sailing canoe named TILIKUM.

Below are some selections from the book:
“My seafaring life commenced in the year 1877, when I was quite a young man. Up to the time that I sailed in the Xora, it was spent in large sailing vessels. During this period, I have filled all sorts of positions from deck boy up to master.
Throughout all those years, I would certainly not have believed that a vessel so small as the Xora could live through a heavy gale at sea. Naturally enough, I should not have thought of attempting a long sea voyage in any small craft if it not been for a gentleman, whose name was George Haffner, an American citizen.

In the summer of 1897, when I was sitting comfortably in an easy chair in the Queen’s Hotel, Victoria, British Columbia, a gentleman stepped up to me, saying, “Are you Captain Voss?” I replied in the affirmative. He then introduced himself as Mr. Haffner, handing me at the same time a letter, saying that it was from an old friend of mine, whose death had taken place at sea just fourteen days previously, and with whom he had stayed during his last moments.”

“…The bearer of this note is Mr. George Haffner, who knows the position where the great treasure lies on Cocos Island. Believe in him, and he will make you a rich man. Excuse my short note, because I am very weak. Kindly remember me to all my old friends and believe me.
Your dying friend,
JIM DEMPSTER”

Captain Voss is one of the early pioneers of long-distance sailboat cruising. He is the first major author in the genre of the sailing narrative write about his travels under sail after Captain Joshua Slocum. He is more famous for his 40,000-mile voyage in a sailing canoe named TILIKUM, but this treasure hunting adventure under sail is a book that will delight all readers.

Oxriver Publishing produces titles of interest to sailboat cruising enthusiasts. This is an annotated and modernized version of Captain Voss’ classic account in the VENTURESOME VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN VOSS, which includes an editor’s note and biography of John C. Voss by Dr. Linus Wilson. The editor is the creator of the Slow Boat Sailing YouTube Channel and Podcast as well as the author of several sailing books.

The eBook of AROUND THE WORLD SINGLE-HANDED: The Cruise of the Islander is at https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B07C3THFZV
Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:
Slow Boat to the Bahamas
Slow Boat to Cuba
https://gumroad.com/l/cubabook
and How to Sail Around the World-Part Time

https://gumroad.com/l/sailing
have been #1 sailing bestseller on Amazon.
Associate Producers Anders Colbenson, Larry Wilson, Ted Royer, and Rick Moore (SSL).
Sign up for our free newsletter for access to free books and other promotions at http://www.slowboatsailing.com
Copyright Linus Wilson, Oxriver Publishing, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018

CHAPTER I: A CHANCE OF A LIFETIME—SEVEN MILLION POUNDS STERLING by Capt. J.C. Voss

My seafaring life commenced in the year 1877, when I was quite a young man. Up to the time that I sailed in the Xora, it was spent in large sailing vessels.  During this period, I have filled all sorts of positions from deck boy up to master.

Pirate Gold

Throughout all those years, I would certainly not have believed that a vessel so small as the Xora could live through a heavy gale at sea. Naturally enough, I should not have thought of attempting a long sea voyage in any small craft if it not been for a gentleman, whose name was George Haffner, an American citizen.

In the summer of 1897, when I was sitting comfortably in an easy chair in the Queen’s Hotel, Victoria, British Columbia, a gentleman stepped up to me, saying, “Are you Captain Voss?” I replied in the affirmative. He then introduced himself as Mr. Haffner, handing me at the same time a letter, saying that it was from an old friend of mine, whose death had taken place at sea just fourteen days previously, and with whom he had stayed during his last moments.

The letter ran as follows:

Dear friend John,

You will be surprised to learn that I am now lying on my deathbed. Yes, dear friend, we are at present a long way out on the Pacific Ocean, and I shall never be able to see land any more, but shall be buried at sea like a dog, and the Pacific Ocean will be my grave.

The bearer of this note is Mr. George Haffner, who knows the position where the great treasure lies on Cocos Island. Believe in him, and he will make you a rich man. Excuse my short note, because I am very weak. Kindly remember me to all my old friends and believe me.

Your dying friend,

JIM DEMPSTER

About five months previous to this meeting with Haffner, a Victoria sealing schooner of about seventy-five tons had been chartered by several enterprising men of Victoria, of whom Dempster was one, for the purpose of sailing down to Cocos Island to make a search for the great treasure, supposed to be buried on that island.

Haffner was in possession of a permit, issued by the Costa Rica government, to secure the treasure if found by him. He stated that, when this sealing schooner—the Aurora—arrived at Cocos Island, he had already been on the island for nine months. During which time, he had vigorously searched for the treasure and had located it.

Surprised at this, I asked him dubiously, why he had not taken the treasure back to Victoria in the Aurora. He explained that having arrived at Cocos Island by the Costa Rica supply boat which undertakes a trip every six months to supply the guard on the island with provisions, he met the crew of the Aurora. Not knowing anything of their intentions, besides not liking the captain, he did not feel disposed to disclose his secret as to where the treasure was buried.

He continued:

Meanwhile the crew of the Aurora worked with all their might and made excavations in many places without, however, having the slightest success. Finally, the men got tired and dissatisfied at having come on a wild goose chase. Besides, their provisions ran short. So, they were compelled to return to Victoria, giving me a passage at the same time.

Shortly after our departure from Cocos Island, Dempster became ill, and as a passenger on board I volunteered to nurse him. I did all I possibly could for him, but he grew worse and worse, so that it was soon plain to me that he would shortly succumb.

Not knowing anybody in Victoria and not being sailor myself, I thought of getting in touch with a responsible person in Victoria who would join me on an expedition to Cocos Island to bring away the treasure. So, I decided to confide the news that I had found the treasure to Dempster.

Greatly surprised at this, he almost gained new life, but realised later that his end was near. He himself could not profit by my communication.

I then asked Dempster to give me the name of a reliable man in Victoria, who would be in a position to procure for me a suitable vessel and crew with which to sail to Cocos Island and carry off the treasure. He mentioned your name and wrote the letter which I have just handed to you.

Because I had found from the day that I first met Dempster on Cocos Island until he died that he was a straightforward and reliable man, I have decided to place confidence in you. I now ask, “Can you and will you procure for me a vessel, fit her out properly, sail with me to Cocos Island, assist me to put the treasure on board, and take it to Victoria?” As compensation, I offer you one-third of whatever we may secure of the treasure. This would be the same as my own share because we have to hand over one-third to the Costa Rica Government.

To my query, Haffner then explained that the treasure was valued at over seven million pounds sterling. Thus, each share would amount to, say, £2,333,000. The treasure consisted principally of gold ingots. Thus, the total quantity of this gold would weigh approximately fifty tons and measure roughly one hundred cubic feet. [1]

Turning these gigantic figures over in my mind, my brain almost became dizzy. At last, at last, I thought to myself, “Your poor old daddy’s words will come true!”

He often told me in a joking way, “When you grow up, John, I shall make a millionaire of you.”

When I was about sixteen years of age and reminded him of his promise, he thought it would cost too much money. He recommended to me to go out into the world and hustle for the million myself. He told me that, if I kept on hustling well and hard, I would certainly succeed in becoming a millionaire.

Of course, like a good son, I took my father’s advice and went to sea. From then until the day I met Haffner, I had been hustling up and down and all round the world. I never had managed to commence becoming a millionaire, even in Japanese sea. As I was then already past forty years of age, I had almost lost confidence in my father’s prophecy prior to meeting Haffner.

This gentleman explained to me in detail where the treasure was buried and showed me a chart of the island. It had cross bearings marked on it to give the position.[2]

All that Haffner said appeared to me so simple and straightforward that I certainly arrived at the conclusion that my fortune was made and that I should in reality become a millionaire. I would be one not only in cents or dollars but also in pounds sterling. I would be a double header at that.

What a grand feeling came over me, a poor man, firmly believing that I would be soon the possessor of millions. The thought of which was with me day and night.

I dreamt, the first night after meeting Haffner, that we were both standing on Cocos Island near a large cave, out of which glittering gold and sparkling diamonds were shining invitingly.

To cut a long story short, I really felt the happiest man in the wide world. I did not fail to have a good time in advance at the prospect of becoming a real millionaire.

In the meantime, I was looking round for a suitable vessel, and found a hundred-ton schooner. Haffner, however, did not quite approve of it, thinking it was not really fit to carry such a valuable cargo. One fine day he said that the vessel was unsuitable. He had luckily, for him, met Admiral Pallister of the Northwest British Squadron. The Admiral had agreed to make a trip to Cocos Island. Under the guidance of Haffner, Admiral Pallister would bring the treasure to Victoria in his flagship, the Imperieuse.

This news struck me like a thunderbolt. “Well, in that case,” I said, “I suppose I am out of it?”

“Very sorry indeed,” he replied, “but I am sure you understand my position. In order to secure the treasure with safety I must have a good ship, and, what is more essential, protection, neither of which you can afford me. By placing myself in the hands of Admiral Pallister, I shall have both.”

I saw that Haffner was right, and probably should have done the same had I been in his position. However, I felt truly miserable. I felt as if I had lost my mental balance. All the castles I had already built in the air had vanished with this sudden blow. What was worse was that I had spent quite a little of my savings. So, the tide of my banking account was at a low ebb.

After leaving Haffner, I would not at first believe his story that a British man-of-war should undertake such an expedition. But it proved to be true when Admiral Pallister left Esquimalt Harbour in his flagship Imperieuse with Haffner on board. It even was escorted by a cruiser for the south.

So, I thought to myself that, instead of being on the road to fortune, I have to hustle again and harder than ever before. I solemnly vowed that I would never again build castles in the air. Nor would I have a good time and spend money in advance on the strength of promise of good prospects. In the future, I would wait until I actually had the cash in hand.

[1] Editor’s Note: This meeting in 1897 was in the middle of the 1896 to 1899 Klondike Gold Rush. Gold fever was motivating many men at this time.

[2] The similarities of the outlines of this story to the runaway success Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson originally published in book form in 1883 are unmistakable.

Above was a selection from Sailing to Treasure Island: The Cruisie of the Xora by Captain J.C. Voss edited and Annotated by Linus Wilson. You can buy the eBook, paperback, or audiobook. They all make great gifts for your favorite sailor.

Ep. 54: Capt. Voss, Sailing to Treasure Island: The Cruise of the Xora read by Linus Wilson

VossThumb

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-3wnn8-a03c40

Linus Wilson reads the first four chapters of Sailing to Treasure Island by Captain John C. Voss. You can get the full audiobook at

www.Patreon.com/slowboatsailing

The paperback at

http://www.lulu.com/shop/captain-jc-voss/sailing-to-treasure-island-the-cruise-of-the-xora/paperback/product-23887731.html

or the eBook at

http://www.lulu.com/shop/captain-jc-voss/sailing-to-treasure-island-the-cruise-of-the-xora/ebook/product-23887490.html

Legendary sailor Captain J. C. Voss meets a mysterious man in his hotel in Victoria, British Columbia in 1897. The mystery man says he knows where tons of gold and jewels are buried on the remote Cocos Island. Voss takes a 35-foot sailing sloop seven thousand miles through gales in search of the pirate Treasure of Lima worth seven thousand pounds sterling in 1897 or over $200 million today.

*This is an edited, abridged, and annotated version of the first section of the Venturesome Voyages of Captain Voss concerning the voyage of the XORA sloop. This is the only part of that work focused on treasure hunting.
*In the 2018 edition, the text is extensively edited as the first edition from 1913 had many run-on sentences and poor subject and verb agreement.
*A biography of the great mariner Captain J.C. Voss is written by the editor.
*Frequent footnotes and an editor’s note put the text in historic context.
*This is an abridged version of the VENTURESOME VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN VOSS. This abridged version focuses exclusively on the cruise of the sailboat XORA and treasure hunting aboard it. Most of the VENTURESOME VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN VOSS is about the voyage of the sailing canoe named TILIKUM.

Below are some selections from the book:
“My seafaring life commenced in the year 1877, when I was quite a young man. Up to the time that I sailed in the Xora, it was spent in large sailing vessels. During this period, I have filled all sorts of positions from deck boy up to master.
Throughout all those years, I would certainly not have believed that a vessel so small as the Xora could live through a heavy gale at sea. Naturally enough, I should not have thought of attempting a long sea voyage in any small craft if it not been for a gentleman, whose name was George Haffner, an American citizen.

In the summer of 1897, when I was sitting comfortably in an easy chair in the Queen’s Hotel, Victoria, British Columbia, a gentleman stepped up to me, saying, “Are you Captain Voss?” I replied in the affirmative. He then introduced himself as Mr. Haffner, handing me at the same time a letter, saying that it was from an old friend of mine, whose death had taken place at sea just fourteen days previously, and with whom he had stayed during his last moments.”

“…The bearer of this note is Mr. George Haffner, who knows the position where the great treasure lies on Cocos Island. Believe in him, and he will make you a rich man. Excuse my short note, because I am very weak. Kindly remember me to all my old friends and believe me.
Your dying friend,
JIM DEMPSTER”

Captain Voss is one of the early pioneers of long-distance sailboat cruising. He is the first major author in the genre of the sailing narrative write about his travels under sail after Captain Joshua Slocum. He is more famous for his 40,000-mile voyage in a sailing canoe named TILIKUM, but this treasure hunting adventure under sail is a book that will delight all readers.

Oxriver Publishing produces titles of interest to sailboat cruising enthusiasts. This is an annotated and modernized version of Captain Voss’ classic account in the VENTURESOME VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN VOSS, which includes an editor’s note and biography of John C. Voss by Dr. Linus Wilson. The editor is the creator of the Slow Boat Sailing YouTube Channel and Podcast as well as the author of several sailing books.
Get Linus Wilson’s bestselling sailing books:
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Copyright Linus Wilson, Oxriver Publishing, Vermilion Advisory Services, LLC, 2018